What is an operating system?

An operating system (OS) is the Application Which, after being initially loaded into the computer by a boot program, oversees all the other application programs in a computer. The application programs make use of the working system by making Furthermore, users can interact directly with the operating system Via a user interface like a command line or a graphical user interface (GUI).

9 Popular Mobile Operating Systems

Android OS (Google Inc.) ...
2. Bada (Samsung Electronics) ...
BlackBerry OS (Research In Motion) ...
iPhone OS / iOS (Apple) ...
MeeGo OS (Nokia and Intel) ...
Palm OS (Garnet OS) ...
Symbian OS (Nokia) ...
webOS (Palm/HP) ...

Types of operating systems.

Operating systems normally include pre-loaded on almost any Computer you purchase. Many men and women use the operating system which comes with their computer, however it is possible to update or perhaps alter operating systems. The three most frequent operating systems for personal computers are Microsoft Windows, macOS, and Linux. A GUI enables you to use your mouse to click on icons, switches , and menus, and that which is clearly displayed on the display by means of a combo of images and text. Each operating system's GUI includes a different feel and look, so if you Switch to another operating system it might appear unfamiliar at first. However, modern operating systems have been made to be effortless to utilize , and the majority of the fundamental principles are exactly the same.

Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
macOS
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
Linux
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.
Operating systems for mobile devices
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.

On a little bit of a tangent from my typical security posting, I thought I’d include some of my “making” efforts.

Due to the working from home for an extended period of time, I wanted to improve my video-conferencing setup somewhat. I have my back to windows, so the lighting is pretty bad, so I wanted to get some lights. I didn’t want to spend big money, so I got this set of Neewer USB-powered lights. It came with tripod bases, monopod-style stands, and ball heads to mount the lights.

The lights work well and are a great value for the money, but the stands are not as great. The tripods are sufficiently light that they’re easy to knock over, and they take more desk space than I’d really like. I have a lot of stuff on my desk, and appreciate desk real estate, so go to great length to minimize permanent fixtures on the desk. I have my monitors on monitor arms, my desk lamp on a mount, etc. I really wanted to minimize the space used by these lights.

I looked for an option to clamp to the desk and support the existing monopods with the light. I found a couple of options on Amazon, but they either weren’t ideal, or I was going to end up spending as much on the clamps as...

The C infinite for-loop gotcha is one of the less frequent issues I find with static analysis, but I feel it is worth documenting because it is obscure but easy to do.

Consider the following C example:

Since i is a 8 bit integer, it will wrap around to zero when it reaches the maximum 8 bit value of 255 and so we end up with an infinite loop if the upper limit of the loop n is 256 or more. 

The fix is simple, always ensure the loop counter is at least as wide as the type of the maximum limit of the loop. This example, variable i should be a uint32_t type.

I've seen this occur in the Linux kernel a few times.  Sometimes it is because the loop counter is being passed into a function call that expects a specific type such as a u8, u16.  In other occasions I've seen a u16 (or short) integer being used presumably because it was expected to produce faster code, however, most commonly 32 bit integers just as fast (or sometimes faster) than 16 bit integers for this kind of operation.

My loft is a treasure trove of old crap. For some reason I keep a bunch of aged useless junk up there. That includes the very first MP3 player I owned. Behold, the Diamond Rio PMP 300. Well, the box, in all its ’90s artwork glory. Here’s the player. It’s powered by a single AA battery for somewhere around 8 hours of playback. It’s got 32MB (yes, MegaBytes) of on-board storage.

I wrote this blog post with Kaylea Champion and a version of this post was originally posted on the Community Data Science Collective blog.

Critical software we all rely on can silently crumble away beneath us. Unfortunately, we often don’t find out software infrastructure is in poor condition until it is too late. Over the last year or so, I have been supporting Kaylea Champion on a project my group announced earlier to measure software underproduction—a term we use to describe software that is low in quality but high in importance.

Underproduction reflects an important type of risk in widely used free/libre open source software (FLOSS) because participants often choose their own projects and tasks. Because FLOSS contributors work as volunteers and choose what they work on, important projects aren’t always the ones to which FLOSS developers devote the most attention. Even when developers want to work on important projects, relative neglect among important projects is often difficult for FLOSS contributors to see.

Given all this, what can we do to detect problems in FLOSS infrastructure before major failures occur? Kaylea Champion and I recently published a paper...

Kubuntu 21.04 Testing Week

We’re delighted to announce that we’re participating in another ‘Ubuntu Testing Week’ from April 1st to April 7th with other flavours in the Ubuntu family. On April 1st, the beta version of Kubuntu 21.04 ‘Hirsute Hippo’ will be released after freezing all new changes to its features, user interface, and documentation. Between April 1st and the final release on April 22nd, all efforts by the Kubuntu team and community should be focused on ISO testing, reporting bugs, fixing bugs, and translations right up to final release.

On social media, please use the #UbuntuTestingWeek hashtag if you write about your testing or want to spread the word about the event to your followers. Testers can visit the ISO tracker and read bug reporting tutorials.

You can test without changing your system by running it in a VM (Virtual Machine) with software like VMWare Player, VirtualBox (apt install). Or run Hirsute from USB, SD Card, or DVD to test on your hardware.

There are a variety of ways that you can help test the release, including trying out the various live session and installation test cases from the ISO tracker. If you find a bug, you’ll need a Launchpad account...

Multiplying integers in C is easy.  It is also easy to get it wrong.  A common issue found using static analysis on the Linux kernel is the integer overflow before widening gotcha.

Consider the following code that takes the 2 unsigned 32 bit integers, multiplies them together and returns the unsigned 64 bit result:

The multiplication is performed using unsigned 32 bit arithmetic and the unsigned 32 bit results is widened to an unsigned 64 bit when assigned to ret. A way to fix this is to explicitly cast a to a uint64_t before the multiplication to ensure an unsigned 64 bit multiplication is performed:

Fortunately static analysis finds these issues.  Unfortunately it is a bug that keeps on occurring in new code.

Sometimes the news about the business of news gets rather weird. There was a very brief news item on NPR’s Weekend Edition that mentioned a newspaper in Kansas City that published a blank front page. The Kansas City Star reported that it was not them that did it and explained which local weekly paper engaged in the stunt to highlight its dire economic condition.

That’s one end of the odd news. In another respect there were posts on Twitter by Glenn Greenwald and Matt Taibbi highlighting an article in the New York Times entitled On Google Podcasts, a Buffet of Hate. The paradigm of podcasting appears to be facing interesting threats that I don’t think anybody ever anticipated. I do think the pop culture reporter at the Times would be rather shocked to learn of an extremely broad world of podcast applications beyond Google Podcasts. Considering what he covers he certainly should know these things yet this horribly slanted piece gets published denigrating podcasting. Very odd.

Why bring this up at all? My local area has difficulties in terms of getting the word out about anything to people let alone providing news coverage to mass audiences. Things that once would have been...

KDE Plasma desktop 5.21 on Kubuntu 21.04

The beta of Hirsute Hippo (to become 21.04 in April) has now been released, and is available for download.

This milestone features images for Kubuntu and other Ubuntu flavours.

Pre-releases of the Hirsute Hippo are not recommended for:

  • Anyone needing a stable system
  • Regular users who are not aware of pre-release issues
  • Anyone in a production environment with data or workflows that need to be reliable

They are, however, recommended for:

  • Regular users who want to help us test by finding, reporting, and/or fixing bugs
  • Kubuntu, KDE, and Qt developers
  • Other Ubuntu flavour developers

The Beta includes some software updates that are ready for broader testing. However, it is an early set of images, so you should expect some bugs.

We STRONGLY advise testers to read the Kubuntu 21.04 Beta release notes before installing, and in particular the section on ‘Known issues‘.

Kubuntu is taking part in #UbuntuTestingWeek from 1st to 7th of April, details of which can be found in our Kubuntu 21.04 Testing Week blog post, and in general for all flavours on the Ubuntu Discourse announcement.

You can also find more information about the entire...

Usually in the realm of Ubuntu when it comes to a “daily driver” we are often talking about computers. Over the past couple days my 2005 Subaru Forester decided to fail on me. Harsh climate, roads that are not well maintained in an economically disadvantaged area, and more helped bring about the end of being able to drive that nice station wagon.

I don’t really ask for much in a car. I don’t really need much in a car. When it comes to the “entertainment system” I end up listening to AM radio for outlets like WJR, WTAM, CKLW, KDKA, and CFZM. On the FM side I have been listening to WERG quite a bit. In the midst of all that I probably forgot to mention the local station WWOW. A simple radio for me goes quite a long way.

In the new vehicle there has been the option for using Android Auto. This is a new thing to me. I’ve only ever had the opportunity to drive a vehicle equipped with such tech this week.

Android Auto is certainly different and something I will need to get used to. Fortunately we live in a time of change. I’m still trying to wrap my head around the idea of having VLC available to me on the car dashboard.

This is definitely not the way I expected to...

The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the Beta release of the Ubuntu 21.04 Desktop, Server, and Cloud products.

21.04, codenamed “Hirsute Hippo”, continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

This Beta release includes images from not only the Ubuntu Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, but also the Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu flavours.

The Beta images are known to be reasonably free of showstopper image build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of 21.04 that should be representative of the features intended to ship with the final release expected on April 22nd, 2021.

Ubuntu, Ubuntu Server, Cloud Images

Hirsute Beta includes updated versions of most of our core set of packages, including a current 5.11 kernel, and much more.

To upgrade to Ubuntu 21.04 Beta from Ubuntu 20.10, follow these instructions:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HirsuteUpgrades

The Ubuntu 21.04 Beta...

The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the beta release of Ubuntu Studio 21.04, codenamed Hirsute Hippo.

While this beta is reasonably free of any showstopper DVD build or installer bugs, you may find some bugs within. This image is, however, reasonably representative of what you will find when Ubuntu Studio 21.04 is released on April 22, 2021.

Please note: Due to the change in desktop environment, directly upgrading to Ubuntu Studio 21.04 from 20.04 LTS is not supported and will not be supported.  However, upgrades from Ubuntu Studio 20.10 will be supported. See the Release Notes for more information.

Images can be obtained from this link: https://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/21.04/beta/

Full updated information is available in the Release Notes.

New Features

Ubuntu Studio 20.04 includes the new KDE Plasma 5.21 desktop environment. This is a beautiful and functional upgrade to previous versions, and we believe you will like it.

Agordejo, a refined GUI frontend to New Session Manager, is now included by default. This uses the standardized session manager calls throughout the Linux Audio community to work with various audio...

We are pleased to announce that the beta images for Lubuntu 21.04 have been released! While we have reached the bugfix-only stage of our development cycle, these images are not meant to be used in a production system. We highly recommend joining our development group or our forum to let us know about any issues. Ubuntu Testing Week Ubuntu, […]

Dando o merecido destaque às novidades do catálogo da Nitrokey, os assuntos deste epuisódio passaram ainda pelos testes de streaming do Constantino e os bash scripts preguiçosos do Carrondo.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://keychronwireless.referralcandy.com/3P2MKM7
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/learn-you-more-code-no-starch-press-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/stuff-that-kids-love-adams-media-books?partner=PUP
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3
  • https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a...

This week we’ve been switching to Brave and KDE. We discuss what Alan’s birthday present could be and go over all your wonderful feeback.

It’s Season 14 Episode 04 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has switched to Brave on everything!
    • Alan has been switched to KDE.
  • We discuss what Alan’s family should get him for his birthday.
  • We share a Command Line Lurve:
    • duf – Disk Usage/Free Utility: the user-friendly alternative to “df”
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
  • Image credit: Mika Baumeister
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

  • Join us in the Ubuntu Podcast Telegram...

Google Pixel phones support what they call ”Motion Photo” which is essentially a photo with a short video clip attached to it. They are quite nice since they bring the moment alive, especially as the capturing of the video starts a small moment before the shutter button is pressed. For most viewing programs they simply show as static JPEG photos, but there is more to the files.

I’d really love proper Shotwell support for these file formats, so I posted a longish explanation with many of the details in this blog post to a ticket there too. Examples of the newer format are linked there too.

Info posted to Shotwell ticket

There are actually two different formats, an old one that is already obsolete, and a newer current format. The older ones are those that your Pixel phone recorded as ”MVIMG_[datetime].jpg", and they have the following meta-data:

Xmp.GCamera.MicroVideo                       XmpText     1  1
Xmp.GCamera.MicroVideoVersion XmpText 1 1
Xmp.GCamera.MicroVideoOffset XmpText 7 4022143
Xmp.GCamera.MicroVideoPresentationTimestampUs XmpText 7 1331607

The offset is actually from the end of the file, so one needs to calculate accordingly. But it is exact...

Num exercício de reavaliação sobre se se altera ou não o nome deste podcast para Streaming, vinho tinto, cerveja e outras cenas ou se mantemos, demos uma volta pelos assuntos mundanos que assolam os vossos anfitriões preferidos.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://keychronwireless.referralcandy.com/3P2MKM7
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/machine-learning-zero-to-hero-manning-publications-books?parner=PUP
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3
  • https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e...

This week we’ve been spring cleaning and being silly on Twitter. We round up the news from the Ubuntu community and discuss our favourite stories from the tech news.

It’s Season 14 Episode 05 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been spring cleaning and finally setup his Razer Huntsman TE keyboard and Razer Naga Left Handed Edition Mouse.
    • Alan has been silly on twitter
  • We discuss the community news:
    • Proposal: Improving the membership application process
    • Yaru MATE for Focal Fossa
    • Announcing Ubuntu on Windows Community Preview – WSL 2
    • Dash to Dock support for GNOME 40 is Underway
    • Ubuntu 21.04 Unveils a Hairy New Default Wallpaper
    • PulseAudio 15 Lands mSBC Codec Support To Enable Bluetooth Wideband Speech
  • We mention some events:
    • elementary Developer Weekend: 26 to 27 of June 2021 – Online, everywhere.
  • We discuss the news:
    • OBS Studio 27.0 RC1 out with Wayland support and browser docking on Linux
    • Oppo release phone with novel camera
    • US Supreme court rules on Oracle Vs Google
  • Image credit: Gabriel Gurrola
  • We are running a crowd funder...


Please welcome new host, Moss Bliss

.

DigiKam 7.2 released
https://www.digikam.org/news/2021-03-22-7.2.0_release_announcement/

4MLinux 36.0 released
https://4mlinux-releases.blogspot.com/2021/03/4mlinux-360-stable-released.html

Malicious changes detected in the PHP project Git repository
https://news-web.php.net/php.internals/113838

New version of Cygwin 3.2.0, the GNU environment for Windows
https://www.mail-archive.com/This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it./msg09612.html

SeaMonkey 2.53.7 Released
https://www.seamonkey-project.org/news#2021-03-30

Nitrux 1.3.9 with NX Desktop is Released
https://nxos.org/changelog/changelog-nitrux-1-3-9/

Parrot 4.11 Released with Security Checker Toolkit
https://parrotsec.org/blog/parrot-4.11-release-notes/

Systemd 248 system manager released
https://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/systemd-devel/2021-March/046289.html

GIMP 2.10.24 released
https://www.gimp.org/news/2021/03/29/gimp-2-10-24-released/

Deepin 20.2 ready for download
https://www.deepin.org/en/2021/03/31/deepin-20-2-beautiful-and-wonderful/

Installer added to Arch Linux installation images
https://archlinux.org/news/installation-medium-with-installer/

Ubuntu 21.04 beta released

It’s boring but important! Stay with me! Please! 😘

For the past couple of years Andreas Cord-Landwehr has done excellent work on moving KDE in a more structured licensing direction. Free software licensing is an often overlooked topic, that is collectively understood to be important, but also incredibly annoying, bureaucratic, and complex. We all like to ignore it more than we should.

If you are working on KDE software you really should check out KDE’s licenses howto and maybe also glance over the comprehensive policy. In particular when you start a new repo!

I’d like to shine some light on a simple but incredibly useful tool: reuse. reuse helps you check licensing compliance with some incredibly easy commands.

Say you start a new project. You create your prototype source, maybe add a readme – after a while it’s good enough to make public and maybe propose for inclusion as mature KDE software by going through KDE Review. You submit it for review and if you are particularly unlucky you’ll have me come around the corner and lament how your beautiful piece of software isn’t completely free software because some files lack any sort of licensing information. Alas!

...

Previously: v5.8

Linux v5.9 was released in October, 2020. Here’s my summary of various security things that I found interesting:

seccomp user_notif file descriptor injection
Sargun Dhillon added the ability for SECCOMP_RET_USER_NOTIF filters to inject file descriptors into the target process using SECCOMP_IOCTL_NOTIF_ADDFD. This lets container managers fully emulate syscalls like open() and connect(), where an actual file descriptor is expected to be available after a successful syscall. In the process I fixed a couple bugs and refactored the file descriptor receiving code.

zero-initialize stack variables with Clang
When Alexander Potapenko landed support for Clang’s automatic variable initialization, it did so with a byte pattern designed to really stand out in kernel crashes. Now he’s added support for doing zero initialization via CONFIG_INIT_STACK_ALL_ZERO, which besides actually being faster, has a few behavior benefits as well. “Unlike pattern initialization, which has a higher chance of triggering existing bugs, zero initialization provides safe defaults for strings, pointers, indexes, and sizes.” Like the pattern initialization, this feature stops entire classes of...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 677 for the week of March 28 – April 3, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu 21.04 (Hirsute Hippo) Final Beta released
  • Reminder — Hirsute kernel freeze is Apr 8
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Call for Beta Testing Ubuntu 21.04 and Ubuntu Flavours
  • Announcing the Ubuntu Desktop Team Indaba (AMA) – April 23, 2021
  • Ubuntu Cloud News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

<noscript> <img alt="" src="https://res.cloudinary.com/canonical/image/fetch/f_auto,q_auto,fl_sanitize,c_fill,w_720/https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/rGteqi_RWPOlpxg9YPN5Y3UOeZVWdMnzvjKYWBSV6G01tn0yqOIcNA-161qgqGm44xd24UfMm2APExlVPOmwsFzL542ShQ-xwxVC1GOyW9cD00toZ0pBVp8-52TMSV1M4X94iq7-" width="720" /> </noscript>

It’s never too late to learn. As any reinforcement learning agent, we get rewarded by the new knowledge that we acquire. Likewise, we learn by doing, by rolling up our sleeves and getting to work. (Do you want a hands-on book on Reinforcement Learning? Here is my personal favourite)

March has shown us great examples of this. From robots learning to encourage social participation to detect serious environmental problems, it was a learning month.  

Learning to become more human 

In a nutshell, human-robot interaction is a field that studies how to develop robots that are going to work closely with people. This is a fascinating field due to the opportunities it represents. For instance, robots can be used in different emotion recognition therapies with children with autism.

But this study from KTH Royal Institute of Technology illustrates perfectly what robots are able...

One year ago I joined GitLab as a Solution Architect. In this blog post I do not want to focus on my role, my daily work or anything all remote pandemic related. Also, there won’t be a huge focus in regard to all remote working. I rather want to focus on my personal experiences in regard to the work culture. I’ll focus on things which I certainly did not think about before I joined GitLab (or any other company before).

Before joining GitLab I worked for four German companies. As a German with a Sri-Lankan Tamil heritage I was always a minority at work. Most of the time it wasn’t an issue. At least that’s what I thought. At all those previous companies there were mostly white male and with very few (or even none) non-males especially in technical and leading roles. Nowadays, I realize what a huge difference a globally distributed company makes with people from different countries, cultures, background and gender.

There were sooo many small things which makes a difference and which opened my eyes.

People are pronouncing my name correctly

Some of you might (hopefully) think:

Wait that was an issue!?

Yes, yes it was. And it was super annoying. Working in a globally...

The web team at Canonical run two-week iterations building and maintaining all of Canonical websites and product web interfaces. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration.

This iteration has seen many of the team out of the office as schools are out in the UK. This has not limited the exciting new features and developments from the team.

Meet the team

Hi, I’m Amy. I joined Canonical as Senior UX Designer a week before the pandemic and haven’t been back to the office since. Despite working remotely with the webteam, it still feels like we’re very close and I miss everyone so much. 

I started out as a Software Engineer and discovered my passion in HCI and UX with a huge love for dumplings. My main purpose in life is to simplify complicated concepts through interaction design, haptic interfaces, and natural interactions. I’m currently working on MAAS (Metal-as-a-service) which is an awesome provisioning tool for private cloud infrastructure. Some of you might have seen my work on the CLI prototype, workload annotations, event logs handling, LXD projects in MAAS, and many more to come. 

I ❤️  cooking because it is very much like product designing –...

The last few weeks was really tough time-wise due to a whole bunch of personal things requiring attention. At least that is cooling down now, in the meantime, here’s last monght’s uploads (16 days late, yikes!). Hope everyone is doing well out there.

2021-02-02: Upload package python-strictyaml (1.1.1-2) to Debian unstable (Initial source-only upload).

2021-02-03: Upload package bundlewrap (4.4.2-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-03: Upload package python-aniso8601 (8.1.1-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-15: Upload package desktop-base (11.0.1-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-15: Upload package rootskel-gtk (11.0.1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-16: Upload package btfs (2.24-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-16: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-multi-monitors (23-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-16: Upload package xabacus (8.3.4-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-19: Upload package bundlewrap (4.5.0-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-19: Upload package calamares (3.2.36-1) to Debian unstable.

2021-02-19: Upload package calamares (3.2.36-1~bpo10+1) to Debian buster-backports.

2021-02-19: Upload package bundlewrap (4.5.1-1) to Debian unstable.

https://blogs.imf.org/2021/03/15/rising-market-power-a-threat-to-the-recovery/

Stable Release Updates on Xubuntu

From the moment an Ubuntu release (and flavors) reaches Final Freeze until the release is end-of-life (EOL), updates are released following the "stable release update" procedure, or SRU. This process is documented on the Ubuntu Wiki. However, it can be intimidating for new and long-time contributors and also confusing for users. I'd like to explain this process from a Xubuntu perspective.

We currently have two packages going through the SRU procedure for Xubuntu 20.04 and 20.10. After you've read this article, consider checking them out and helping with verification.

  • Xfce Weather Plugin
  • Exo

Stable Release Update Procedure

  1. Identify the "why"
  2. Create or update bug reports
  3. Package and upload the fixes for each release
  4. Wait for the SRU team to review and accept the upload
  5. SRU Verification
  6. Wait for the SRU team to release the package to the -updates pocket

Identify the "why"

A common misconception about stable Ubuntu releases is that all bug fixes and new releases (small and large) will arrive via an update. There is not an automatic process for these updates to land in a stable release. Further, any fixes and new features have to be documented and tested according to the procedure above. As you...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 674 for the week of March 7 – 13, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) begins April 30 2021
  • Welcome New Members and Developers
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • New installer design
  • Ubuntu Cloud News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

If you are already building Snap packages, I guess you know what an “interface” is in the world for Snapcraft. However it seems, the terminology may not be very clear for someone who doesn’t know anything (my developer friends and colleagues) about Snap. So I just wanted to clearly write this one out so that it becomes clear for people coming from Android App development background. I like to think that “permissions” in Android and “interfaces” in Snap world are pretty much interchangeable. I have done a fair amount of Android App development (professionally and privately) in the past six years and have been involved in the Snapcraft ecosystem almost since it’s inception.

Before going into further details I think it’d make sense to clear some of the Snapcraft terminologies as well.

  • Snapcraft is the name of the wider project, which involves the build tools, the public Store, the daemon that runs on your computer to manage and update snap packages. However snapcraft is also the name of the command line tool that is used to actually build snap packages, confusing ? yeah, a bit!
  • Snapd is the software and daemon that runs on your computer to install/remove/update snap packages...

Net Matroyshka was one of our “1337” tagged challenges for the 2021 BSidesSF CTF. This indicated it was particularly hard, and our players can probably confirm that.

If you haven’t played our CTF in the past, you might not be familiar with the Matryoshka name. (Yep, I misspelled Matryoshka this year and didn’t catch it before we launched.) It refers to the nesting Matryoshka dolls, and we’ve been doing a series of challenges where they contain layers to be solved, often by different encodings, formats, etc. This year, it was layers of PCAPs for some network forensics challenges.

The description from the scoreboard was simple:

We heard you like PCAPs, so we put a PCAP inside your PCAP.

You were provided with a file 8.zip, which yielded 8.pcap when unzipped.

Layer 8: HTTP

Looking at 8.pcap in Wireshark, we see a bunch of small HTTP packets and several HTTP connections. If you look at the HTTP request statistics, we see several connections, including the BSidesSF website, my website, and a request to a private IP for a file named 7.zip.

HTTP Requests

Guessing that we’ll need 7.zip, you can use Wireshark to extract the HTTP object (the contents). (File > Export Objects >...

“Hirsute Hippo” is the project code-name for what will become Ubuntu 21.04 when it releases on April 22nd 2021. On April 1st, the Beta of Ubuntu Hirsute will be released, but we’re no fools! This is a great time to do some testing! So, starting on April 1st, we’re doing another Ubuntu Testing Week. As always, everyone is welcome to test Ubuntu at any point in the year. But during the beta is a good time to focus on testing.

I can’t quite sleep at the moment as I am trying to process some events that took place on Wednesday. I have to reassess where things stand in some cases. While it did not happen directly to me I will say that The Event was not a good one.

Presently I am blogging using the bashblog script by Carlos Fenollosa. It is very barebones and right now that’s exactly what I need. I did some fiddling and through the use of the Google Web Fonts API ended up deploying the Public Sans font instead of the default now. That will give it a far more striking look than the previous font selection.

Blogging remains a key way to keep up with me. The Twitter account is likely not the most informative and the Identica account randomly disappears into the Bermuda Triangle. There is not a LaTeX2e-based social network to the best of my knowledge.

While more could likely be said that simply would not be prudent at this time.

Tags: Life

The GNOME team have announced GNOME 40. Along with this there’s a GNOME OS image to play with. You can grab that from here with the release notes. The release announcement firmly (in bold) suggests “Do not use any other version including the distro version. Only GNOME Boxes 3.38.0 from flathub is known to work.”. Personally I’ve never managed to have much success with GNOME Boxes, so I thought I’d test using something I already have installed, QEMU!

Trying to share a GTK application window with https://meet.google.com/ might not work if you run under a Wayland session.

A workaround is to run a GTK application under XWayland:

GDK_BACKEND=x11 gedit

Now gedit can be shared within google meet.

If you want to share a gnome-terminal window, things are a bit more complicated. gnome-terminal has a client/server architecture so gnome-terminal-server needs to run with the x11 backend.

mkdir -p ~/.config/systemd/user/gnome-terminal-server.service.d/
cat <<EOF > ~/.config/systemd/user/gnome-terminal-server.service.d/override.conf
[Service]
Environment=GDK_BACKEND=x11
EOF
systemctl --user daemon-reload
systemctl --user restart gnome-terminal-server

The last command will kill all your terminals!

Now you can share your gnome-terminal windows again!

Things have been a bit strange. Looking at things in an itemized fashion but in no particular order:

  • It appears that Telegram is adding support for an increased amount of voice chats. Is this a pivot for that platform?

  • Apparently there are people talking about self-hosting their git repositories. There are multiple variations on this as seen elsewhere. There remains the option of using Gitea as well. No, I am not thinking of abandoning my git repos on Launchpad at this time.

  • The current cycle’s release schedule shows us between User Interface Freeze and Documentation String Freeze. Beta Freeze hits on March 29th and the mandatory beta is on April 1st. Easter, for those who celebrate such and follow the western rite calendar, will fall on April 4th.

  • This seems unusual and needs further verification.

  • Considering how fragile the Internet seems to be lately based upon the latest disruption out in Myanmar perhaps I should start exploring BBS Corner for retro paradigms to resurrect?

  • The third novella to go up on Kindle Direct Publishing is still being proofed by Reader One. I forget which draft I am on. The novel and markdown packages are being leveraged from CTAN.

  • I have not been...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 675 for the week of March 14 – 20, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • IRC Council Call for Nominations (2021)
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Ubucon Asia 2021 Meeting reports update thread
  • Hirsute Hippo Draft Release Notes
  • Snap interfaces from Android App developer perspective
  • Linux Application Summit: Call For Papers
  • Ubuntu Wiki Reboot
  • Stable Release Updates on Xubuntu
  • Ubuntu Cloud News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Other Articles of Interest
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

KDE Gear is the new name for the app (and libraries and plugins) bundle of project that want the release faff taken off their hands. It was once called just KDE, then KDE SC, then KDE Applications, then the unbranded release service and now we’re banding it again as KDE Gear.

We’re working on an announcement now for 21.04 so if you have a project being released as part of KDE Gear send us your new features on this merge request.

Conversa (ainda) sobre o tracking via CNAME, fizemos também um duelo de ratos e não podíamos deixar de comentar o churrasco da semana que aconteceu em Estrasburgo, vulgo datacenter da OVH.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • http://keychronwireless.refr.cc/tiagocarrondo
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3
  • https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

A música do genérico é:...

Shifting integers in C is easy.  Alas it is also easy to get it wrong.  A common issue found using static analysis on the Linux kernel is the unintentional sign extension gotcha.

Consider the following code that takes the 4 unsigned 8 bit integers in array data and returns an unsigned 64 bit integer:

C promotes the uint8_t integers into signed ints on the right shift. If data[3] has the upper bit set, for example with the value 0x80 and data[2]..data[0] are zero, the shifted 32 bit signed result is sign extended to a 64 bit long and the final result is 0xffffffff80000000.  A way to fix this is to explicitly cast data[3] to a uint64_t before shifting it.


Fortunately static analysis finds these issues.  Unfortunately it is a bug that keeps on occurring in new code.

This week we have been rediscovering keybase.io and blogging, a lot. We discuss a smart TV equipped with RokuOS, bring you some command line love and round up all your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 14 Episode 02 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been rediscovering keybase.io.
    • Alan has been blogging.
  • We discuss the Hisense Roku 43 Inch R43B7120UK 4K Smart HDR LED Freeview TV.
  • We share a Command Line Lurve:
    • dpkg-query -Wf '${Installed-Size}t${Package}n' | sort -rn | less – List installed debs by size
dpkg-query -Wf '${Installed-Size}t${Package}n' | sort -rn | less
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
  • Image credit: Efren Barahona
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet us or Toot us...

I used 2 of the variants supported by mmdebstrap to illustrate the different small build options.

Essential

Uncompressed tarball size 94M

For when you don't even want to have apt.

base-files
base-passwd
bash
bsdutils
coreutils
dash
debconf
debianutils
diffutils
dpkg
findutils
gcc-10-base:amd64
grep188M
init-system-helpers
libacl1:amd64
libattr1:amd64
libaudit-common
libaudit1:amd64
libblkid1:amd64
libbz2-1.0:amd64
libc-bin
libc6:amd64
libcap-ng0:amd64
libcom-err2:amd64
libcrypt1:amd64
libdb5.3:amd64
libdebconfclient0:amd64
libgcc-s1:amd64
libgcrypt20:amd64
libgmp10:amd64
libgpg-error0:amd64
libgssapi-krb5-2:amd64
libk5crypto3:amd64
libkeyutils1:amd64
libkrb5-3:amd64
libkrb5support0:amd64
liblz4-1:amd64
liblzma5:amd64
libmount1:amd64
libnsl2:amd64
libpam-modules:amd64
libpam-modules-bin
libpam-runtime
libpam0g:amd64
libpcre2-8-0:amd64
libpcre3:amd64
libselinux1:amd64
libsmartcols1:amd64
libssl1.1:amd64
libsystemd0:amd64
libtinfo6:amd64
libtirpc-common
libtirpc3:amd64
libudev1:amd64
libuuid1:amd64debian-requirements.md
zlib1g:amd64

Added in minbase

Uncompressed tarball size...

Introduction

If you have data that requires more power than the typical laptop, creating a software RAID can be an easy and inexpensive solution. With the rise of data science and machine learning, processing large sets of data using Pandas, NumPy, Spark or even SQLite can drastically benefit from fast and resilient storage.

RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) is useful for achieving high performance and recovery if a disk fails. There are many types of configurations including hardware, pretend hardware (raid actually done in software), and software. RAID10 (mirrored and striped) provides high performance and redundancy against a single disk failure. RAID10 writes a copy of the data to two disks, and then in the 4-disk setup described below, creates a volume that spans a second set of two disks. This allows for reading and writing using all four disks, and potentially allows for up to two disk failures without losing data (if we are lucky). In the worst-case RAID10 can always suffer a single disk failure without losing any data.

Another popular approach is RAID5, which splits data across devices using an Exclusive OR (XOR) and has a parity block. RAID5 setups are...

Description

A defective livepatch for kernel 4.4 in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial) was not caught in internal testing processes because the defect was a race condition, triggered by workload-specific behaviour, under load.

The livepatch would cause the madvise system call to block indefinitely, and thus cause lockup to the processes using the call. These conditions were not replicated in our test environment.

After passing internal testing, the livepatch was published to our free tier users (typically personal systems). Canonical services also run in this tier as an early warning system, and the defect was noticed at that stage. Customers with systems configured for this tier were also impacted. The livepatch causing the defect was retracted one and a half hours after publication, however the standard update process is designed to patch all online systems within one hour.

The faulty livepatch was addressing a Medium severity CVE (CVE-2020-29372). This CVE fix came in as part of our normal SRU processes. The livepatch was tested in combination with an embargoed high severity CVE, and at no time did we see any issues with systems as we tested the combined livepatch. As part of the...

I served as a director and as a voting member of the Free Software Foundation for more than a decade. I left both positions over the last 18 months and currently have no formal authority in the organization.

So although it is now just my personal opinion, I will publicly add my voice to the chorus of people who are expressing their strong opposition to Richard Stallman’s return to leadership in the FSF and to his continued leadership in the free software movement. The current situation makes me unbelievably sad.

I stuck around the FSF for a long time (maybe too long) and worked hard (I regret I didn’t accomplish more) to try and make the FSF better because I believe that it is important to have voices advocating for social justice inside our movement’s most important institutions. I believe this is especially true when one is unhappy with the existing state of affairs. I am frustrated and sad that I concluded that I could no longer be part of any process of organizational growth and transformation at FSF.

I have nothing but compassion, empathy, and gratitude for those who are still at the FSF—especially the staff—who are continuing to work silently toward making the...

This month:
* Command & Conquer : LMMS
* How-To : Python, Latex [NEW!] and Fritzing
* Graphics : Inkscape
* Linux Loopback : My Story
* Everyday Ubuntu : RetroComputing CoCo Nuts Pt2
* Micro This Micro That [NEW!]
* Review : Entroware Ares
* Book Review: Learn Linux Quickly
* Ubuntu Games : Nebuchadnezar
plus: News, My Story, The Daily Waddle, Q&A, and more.

Get it while it’s hot: https://fullcirclemagazine.org/issue-167/

Telegram group: https://t.me/joinchat/PujkVH1HopRKvfd3

Os desafios que os vossos podcasters preferidos têm de ultrapassar para vos entregar semanalmente um episódio foi um dos temas deste episódio. Isso, nextclouds e a OTA-16 do UBPorts!

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://ubports.com/pt/blog/ubports-blogs-noticias-1/post/ubuntu-touch-ota-16-release-3744
  • https://keychronwireless.referralcandy.com/3P2MKM7
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/learn-you-more-code-no-starch-press-books?partner=PUP
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3
  • https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a...

This week we’ve been migrating to Bitwarden and upgrading servers. We round up news from the Ubuntu community, events, and our picks from the tech news.

It’s Season 14 Episode 03 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Mark has been migrating to Bitwarden.
    • Alan has been upgrading a server.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • Extensions Rebooted Porting your existing existsions to GNOME 40
    • Thunderbird 2020 Financial Report
    • Nightfall Hacker goes free for Linux on the Snap store
    • Snap interfaces from Android App developer perspective
    • Audacity 3.0.0 Released
  • We mention some events:
    • Ubuntu Testing Week: 1st to 7th of April 2021 – Everywhere and online.
  • We discuss the news:
    • Microsoft in Talks to Buy Discord for More Than $10 Billion
    • Demoscene accepted as unesco cultural heritage in Germany
    • Police warn students to avoid science website
  • Image credit: Егор Камелев
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d...

Today, Kubernetes upstream made the 1.21 release candidate available for download and experimentation ahead of general availability, which will come later in April. Woohoo! We would love to get your feedback ahead of the general release and hear about any bugs or issues you find. Or, if you just want to give the bleeding edge of K8s features a try, get up and running with MicroK8s.

Test the release on your machine, play around with it, kick the tyres. Then, if you have feedback, good or bad, let us know on Discourse or Slack (#microk8s). And if you have any bugs or technical issues to report, you can file them over on GitHub.

How to test the latest Kubernetes with MicroK8s

 To get the latest Kubernetes on your machine, install MicroK8s and get a lightweight, zero-ops K8s cluster:

sudo snap install microk8s –channel=1.21/beta –classic

Alternatively, go to https://snapcraft.io/microk8s and select 1.21/beta

<noscript> <img alt="" height="366"...

Em vésperas do colapso – ou pelo menos de algumas dores de cabeça – de parte da Internet à conta dos certificados da Multicert, estivemos a olhar para cameras virtuais, nextcloud, Thunderbird, Let’s Encrypt, Ubuntu core e muito mais.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://ubuntu.com//blog/ubuntu-core-20-secures-linux-for-iot
  • https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/inside-ubuntu-core-20/20777
  • https://www.packtpub.com/product/mastering-ubuntu-server-third-edition/9781800564640
  • https://open-store.io/app/teleports.ubports
  • https://ubports.com/blog/ubport-blogs-news-1/post/the-ubuntu-touch-devices-website-has-leveled-up-3740
  • https://wiki.mozilla.org/CA:Camerfirma_Issues
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/pocket-reference-guides-oreilly-books?partnet=PUP
  • http://keychronwireless.refr.cc/tiagocarrondo
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/shop?aff_ref=3
  • https://youtube.com/PodcastUbuntuPortugal

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15...

The campaign is apparently real now that I have made it to the second day. It still doesn’t feel that way. This is a breakdown of where my projects are and how they are likely to be impacted. In no particular order:

  • Sean mentioned that Xubuntu documentation updates are in need of help. I did help with updating the text but getting the new text converted into acceptable DocBook source takes time as well as patience. I encourage people to look at trying that hand with DocBook.
  • Any community-related works on my part within the Ubuntu context are scrapped at the moment. Apologies have already been given.
  • Development of the newspaper project will continue though commits to that repo may be on pause while inquiries are made of hardware dealers.
  • The set of currently monitored podcasts should like still be maintained.
  • The third novelette that I have been writing to eventually release via Kindle Direct Publishing is on indefinite hold. It is not necessarily impacted by the campaign but rather by the sense of unease I still have after the events of January 6th. That things did not end then continues to bother me. There are rumors of further unrest reported by NBC News and Vox. ...

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