What is an operating system?

An operating system (OS) is the Application Which, after being initially loaded into the computer by a boot program, oversees all the other application programs in a computer. The application programs make use of the working system by making Furthermore, users can interact directly with the operating system Via a user interface like a command line or a graphical user interface (GUI).

9 Popular Mobile Operating Systems

Android OS (Google Inc.) ...
2. Bada (Samsung Electronics) ...
BlackBerry OS (Research In Motion) ...
iPhone OS / iOS (Apple) ...
MeeGo OS (Nokia and Intel) ...
Palm OS (Garnet OS) ...
Symbian OS (Nokia) ...
webOS (Palm/HP) ...

Types of operating systems.

Operating systems normally include pre-loaded on almost any Computer you purchase. Many men and women use the operating system which comes with their computer, however it is possible to update or perhaps alter operating systems. The three most frequent operating systems for personal computers are Microsoft Windows, macOS, and Linux. A GUI enables you to use your mouse to click on icons, switches , and menus, and that which is clearly displayed on the display by means of a combo of images and text. Each operating system's GUI includes a different feel and look, so if you Switch to another operating system it might appear unfamiliar at first. However, modern operating systems have been made to be effortless to utilize , and the majority of the fundamental principles are exactly the same.

Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
macOS
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
Linux
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.
Operating systems for mobile devices
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.

On Ubuntu Linux snaps are app packages for desktop, cloud and IoT that are easy to install, secure, cross‐platform and dependency‐free and their main selling point is security and confinement.

Traditionally packaging for Ubuntu is via .deb packages but much as I try, I never find it straight forward to create or maintain deb packages and I find creating snap packages much easier.

One use case of snaps which doesn’t get talked about much is using snaps to bring no longer supported software back to life. For example, in Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) which is soon to be released there is no longer support for python2 by default and many other packages have been deprecated too in favour of newer and better replacements. This does mean though that packages which depended on these deprecated packages are not installable and will not run. Snaps can fix this.

Snaps have the concept of Base snaps where is snap can specify a runtime which is based on a previous release of Ubuntu.

  • core20 base is based on Ubuntu 20.04
  • core18 base is based on Ubuntu 18.04
  • core base is based on Ubuntu 16.04

As such you can create snap packages of any software that is installable on any of these...

Your team has provided you a PyTorch model, and they have asked you to make it available online, so their magic can be used all around the world! How to do so?

In this three parts tutorial we will see how to deploy such a model on AWS ECS, discussing different approaches, which technologies are available and what are our options. We will gather some best practices, based on real word experience in deploying models to production.

The first tutorial is about how to properly package the model inside a Docker image thanks to PyTorch Serve. While it is not a hard task, there are some tricks and optimizations that are worth sharing, to make the Docker image as small as possible, and to make it faster to build.

The second tutorial is about how to configure AWS ECS with Fargate to host the Docker image: since there is no silver bullet, we analyze different setups, based on the kind of workload you are expecting. We minimize expenses, following AWS best practices about networking and security.

The third tutorial is about building a CI/CD system, and being able to have an always up-to-date testing environment, and a one-click deployment process for production. We use Gitlab CI,...

My dad’s got a Brother DCP-7055W printer/scanner, and he wanted to be able to set it up as a network scanner to his Ubuntu machine. This was more fiddly than it should be, and involved a bunch of annoying terminal work, so I’m documenting it here so I don’t lose track of how to do it should I have to do it again. It would be nice if Brother made this easier, but I suppose that it working at all under Ubuntu is an improvement on nothing.

Anyway. First, go off to the Brother website and download the scanner software. At time of writing, https://www.brother.co.uk/support/dcp7055/downloads has the software, but if that’s not there when you read this, search the Brother site for DCP-7055 and choose Downloads, then Linux and Linux (deb), and get the Driver Installer Tool. That’ll get you a shell script; run it. This should give you two new commands in the Terminal: brsaneconfig4 and brscan-skey.

Next, teach the computer about the scanner. This is what brsaneconfig4 is for, and is all done in the Terminal. You need to know the scanner’s IP address; you can find this out from the scanner itself, or you can use avahi-resolve -v -a -r to search your network for it. This will dump out a...

Another month, another bunch of uploads. The freeze for Debian 11 (bullseye) is edging closer, so I’ve been trying to get my package list in better shape ahead of that. Thanks to those who worked on fixing lintian.debian.org and the lintian reports on the QA pages, those are immensely useful and it’s great to have that back!

2020-10-04: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-draw-on-your-screen (8-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-10-05: Sponsor package flask-restful (0.3.8-4) for Debian unstable (Python Team request).

2020-10-05: Sponsor package python-potr (1.0.2-3) for Debian unstable (Python Team request).

2020-10-06: Sponsor package python-pyld (2.0.3-1) for Debian unstable (Python Team request).

2020-10-06: Sponsor package flask-openid (1.2.5+dfsg-4) for Debian unstable (Python Team request).

2020-10-06: Sponsor package qosmic (1.6.0-4) for Debian unstable (E-mail request).

2020-10-07: File removal for gnome-shell-extension-workspace-to-dock (RC Buggy, no longer maintained: #971803).

2020-10-07: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-pixelsaver (1.20-2) to Debian unstable (Closes:  #971689).

2020-10-07: Upload package calamares (3.2.31-1) to Debian...

I frequently see a pattern in image build/refresh scripts where a set of packages is installed, and then all packages are updated:

apt update
apt install -y pkg1 pkg2 pkg2
apt dist-upgrade -y

While it’s not much, this results in redundant work. For example reading/writing package database, potentially running triggers (man-page refresh, ldconfig, etc). The internal package dependency resolution stuff isn’t actually different: “install” will also do upgrades of needed packages, etc. Combining them should be entirely possible, but I haven’t found a clean way to do this yet.

The best I’ve got so far is:

apt update
apt-cache dumpavail | dpkg --merge-avail -
(for i in pkg1 pkg2 pkg3; do echo "$i install") | dpkg --set-selections
apt-get dselect-upgrade

This gets me the effect of running “install” and “upgrade” at the same time, but not “dist-upgrade” (which has slightly different resolution logic that’d I’d prefer to use). Also, it includes the overhead of what should be an unnecessary update of dpkg’s database. Anyone know a better way to do this?

Update: Julian Andres Klode pointed out that dist-upgrade actually takes package arguments too just like install. *face palm* I didn’t...

Adoptámos um novo animal de estimação, numa semana repleta de animação com o encontro mensal da Comundade Ubuntu Portugal, Hacktoberfest e o lançamento Groovy Gorilla, aqui fica mais um episódio no vosso podcast preferido.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.powerpc-notebook.org/pt
  • https://letsencrypt.org/docs/rate-limits
  • https://github.com/InterruptorPt/ate-onde-chega-cultura
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQoZTcUsnlw
  • https://interruptor.pt/artigos/interruptor-x-hacktoberfest
  • https://podes.pt/programa
  • https://www.opensourcelisbon.com

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi...

Canonical is the publisher of official Ubuntu images on Microsoft Azure. Users can find the latest Ubuntu images in the Azure Marketplace when using the web interface. For a programmatic interface, users can use Microsoft’s Azure CLI. All images published by Canonical are discoverable using the following command: az vm image list --all --publisher Canonical The output will produce JSON output with the following information for each image: { "offer": "0001-com-ubuntu-server-focal", "publisher": "Canonical", "sku": "20_04-lts-gen2", "urn": "Canonical:0001-com-ubuntu-server-focal:20_04-lts-gen2:20.

I work on the Canonical Public Cloud team and we publish all of the Ubuntu server images used in the cloud.

We often get asked what the differences are between two released images. For example what is the difference between the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS image kvm optimised image from 20200921 and the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS image kvm optimised image from 20201014, specifically what packages changed and what was included in those changes?

For each of our download images published to http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/ we publish a package version manifest which lists all the packages installed and the versions installed at that time. It also lists any installed snaps the the revision of that snap currently installed. This is very useful for checking to see if an image you are about to use has the expected package version for your requirements or has the expected package version that addresses a vulnerability.

Example snippet from a package version manifest:

<snip>
python3-apport	2.20.11-0ubuntu27.9
python3-distutils	3.8.5-1~20.04.1
</snip>

This manifest is also useful to determine the differences between two images. You can do a simple diff of the manifests which will show you the...

Given a PyTorch model, how should we put it in a Docker image, with all the related dependencies, ready to be deployed?

cover

Photo by Michael Dziedzic on Unsplash

You know the drill: your Data Science team has created an amazing PyTorch model, and now they want you to put it in production. They give you a .pt file and some preprocessing script. What now?

Luckily, AWS and Facebook have created a project, called Torch Serve, to put PyTorch images in production, similarly to Tensorflow Serving. It is a well crafted Docker image, where you can upload your models. In this tutorial we will see how to customize the Docker image to include your model, how to install other dependencies inside it, and which configuration options are available.

We include the PyTorch model directly inside the Docker image, instead of loading it at runtime; while loading it at runtime as some advantages and makes sense in some scenario (as in testing labs where you want to try a lot of different models), I don’t think it is suitable for production. Including the model directly in the Docker image has different advantages:

  • if...

As you may know, Ubuntu Membership is a recognition of a significant and sustained contribution to Ubuntu and the Ubuntu community. To this end, the Community Council recruits from our current member community for the valuable role of reviewing and evaluating the contributions of potential members to bring them on board or assist with having them achieve this goal.

Our board members have now expired, and we are looking to restaff our 12:00 and 20:00 UTC Membership Boards with seven new members for each board.

We have the following requirements for nominees:

  • be an Ubuntu Member (preferably for some time)
  • be confident that you can evaluate contributions to various parts of our community
  • be committed to attending the membership meetings broad insight into the Ubuntu community at large is a plus

Additionally, those sitting on membership boards should have a proven track record of activity in the community. They have shown themselves over time to work well with others and display the Ubuntu Code of Conduct’s positive aspects. They should be people who can discern character and evaluate contribution quality without emotion while engaging in an interview/discussion that communicates...

November is the time when there is the creative writing project known as NaNoWriMo or National Novel Writing Month. The goal is to write a fifty thousand word creative fiction piece in one month. In many ways it gives people a chance to let their imaginations unfurl stories that are bunched up in confined spaces.

In England and elsewhere November is also a time of lockdown presently. My morning weekday newspaper USA TODAY provides plenty of updates from across my country and across the planet in the matter with one report after another. The fatigue is quite real.

Alongside what we are doing during the Hirsute Hippo cycle I do suggest folks take the time to create works of fiction. Sticking to routine can be good in many ways but it can also drive you nuts. It is okay to feel like this is the darkest timeline. Pulling yourself out of that and taking positive steps forward is something we can all attempt to do, though.

I will suggest writing in CommonMark and keeping your formatting to a minimum in your original manuscript. Why? You could then most easily go from then after some editing of the text and format it for Kindle Direct Publishing, LeanPub, Smashwords, or another...

<noscript> <img alt="" src="https://res.cloudinary.com/canonical/image/fetch/f_auto,q_auto,fl_sanitize,c_fill,w_720/https://ubuntu.com/wp-content/uploads/fa63/Ubuntu16.04_ESM_blog.png" width="720" /> </noscript>

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus will enter the extended security maintenance (ESM) period in April 2021. This article explains the ESM period and provides a guide for six key considerations when planning a migration path from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

Contact us with your ESM questions

What is ESM?

Every Ubuntu Long Term Support (LTS) release has two maintenance periods – the standard security period and the extended security maintenance (ESM) period. After the standard five-year security maintenance and updates period, Ubuntu LTS can benefit from an extended period of maintenance and security patching. With ESM, Ubuntu 16.04 gains three extra years of security updates, shifting its end of life date to April 2024.

What should I do?

Here are six key considerations:

1) Think about what it would take to migrate from 16.04 LTS. You can either upgrade your 16.04 LTS to 18.04 LTS, or get yourself a fresh install of the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. If you want to upgrade from 16.04 LTS...

Some time ago I switched to AwesomeWM and with that came another change, my default terminal emulator. Having used GNOME terminal for years, I soon switched to Terminator back in the day. Leaving GNOME behind, in search for a more lean desktop with less frills and more keyboard centric features, I also had to ditch that terminal emulator (it has too many dependencies for my use case). Eventually I stumbled upon st, which fit the bill.

st still seems almost perfect for me and I'm sticking with it, for now. There is one annoying bug though, which came to light when I started receiving e-mails with emoticons. Those emoticons crashed my 'st' instance!

This is actually caused by an upstream Xft bug. When emoticons are displayed, they crash st. I had to resort to using xterm sometimes, which is, well, not a great experience nowadays. I set out on a journey to fix my desktop.

FAQ

So I checked the FAQ of st and found an answer to my issue:

 ## BadLength X error in Xft when trying to render emoji

 Xft makes st crash when rendering color emojis with the following error:

 "X Error of failed request:  BadLength (poly request too large or internal Xlib length error)"
   Major opcode of...

<noscript> <img alt="" src="https://res.cloudinary.com/canonical/image/fetch/f_auto,q_auto,fl_sanitize,c_fill,w_720/https://ubuntu.com/wp-content/uploads/9144/Capture.jpg" width="720" /> </noscript>

Register for Operators Day

Date: Tuesday, November 17
Registration Fees: Complimentary

KubeCon NA is just around the corner and, as always, we aim to give back to the community in any way we can. That’s why, in the context of the upcoming KubeCon, we’re hosting a full-day training on operators, led by Canonical’s engineers.

The Open Operators Day is for devops to learn about the Open Operator Collection, an open-source initiative to provide a large number of interoperable, easily integrated operators for common workloads. We’ll talk about where Open Operators come from and what the community is looking to build. Organized by Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu, the day will be split in 3 time zone friendly sessions:

  • Asia: 14:00-18:00 CST (1:00 AM – 5:00 AM ET)
  • EMEA: 13:00-17:00 BST (8:00 AM – 12:00 PM ET)
  • Americas: 11:00-15:00 PST (2:00 PM – 6:00 PM ET)

Each session will mix keynotes, training and community discussions.Please note that pre-registration is required. 

Speakers: 

  • Mark...

The Linux App Summit runs this Thursday to Saturday. Like Akademy it’s scheduled on a Hispanic friendly time which gives sessions in the European morning (08:00UTC) good for out eastern friends and sessions in the European afternoons (15:30UTC) good for our western friends.

As well as the conference programme check out the Breakout sessions over a European lunch.

As well as updates on Snaps, Flathub and Appimage there’s talks on AppStream, libcamera and very exciting is CGroups. Register now to turn up on Thursday.

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 656 for the week of November 1 – 7, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu Membership Boards Call for Nominations
  • Welcome New Members and Developers
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Ubucon Asia 2021 – Looking for organizers
  • Hirsute Hippo Draft Release Notes
  • Restaffing
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Other Articles of Interest
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License


Valve’s Pressure Vessel Source Code Available
https://www.gamingonlinux.com/2020/10/valve-put-their-pressure-vessel-container-source-for-linux-games-up-on-gitlab
Looking to Abandon the X Server
https://ajaxnwnk.blogspot.com/2020/10/on-abandoning-x-server.html
Linux Mint Now Maintains Their Own Chromium
https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3978
Freespire 7.0 Out
https://www.freespire.net/2020/10/freespire-70-released.html

Linux Lite 5.2 Out
https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/release-announcements/linux-lite-5-2-final-released/

Ubuntu 21.04 Release Date Set
https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/hirsute-hippo-release-schedule/18539
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel/2020-October/041248.html

KDE Plasma 5.20.2 Out
https://kde.org/announcements/plasma-5.20.2/

Nvidia Short Lived Driver 455.38 Out
https://www.nvidia.com/Download/driverResults.aspx/166177/en-us

Credits:
Full Circle Magazine
@fullcirclemag
Host: @leochavez
BumperCanonical
Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust
https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Chegámos a Novembro, muito animados que o final de 2020 está cada vez mais próximo e temos esperança que o upgrade para 2021 venha corrigir parte dos bugs desta versão que claramente saiu torta… Aqui fica mais um episódio no vosso podcast preferido.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/pro1-x-smartphone-functionality-choice-control#/
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop?aff_ref=3
  • https://twitter.com/hello_volla/status/1319976344390950917
  • https://www.meshtastic.org/
  • https://forum.pine64.org/showthread.php?tid=11772
  • https://twitter.com/thepine64/status/1314911896177389570
  • https://www.pine64.org/2020/10/15/update-new-hacktober-gear/
  • https://pine64.com/product/pinephone-community-edition-3gb-32gb-mainboard-special-offer-for-braveheart-and-ubports-owners/?v=0446c16e2e66
  • https://twitter.com/braam_martijn/status/1322949166042107909
  • https://podes.pt/programa/
  • https://www.opensourcelisbon.com
  • https://www.facebook.com/events/3574353429252373/
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/software/stem-productivity-library-mercury-books?partner=PUP

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma...

This week we’ve been hacking Steam controllers and making fast home directories. We round up the Ubuntu community news, discuss the 21.04 codename, Raspberry Pi images for Ubuntu MATE, Trisquel 9.0, snap speed improvements and turn our lights on and off from GNOME Shell. We also round up some news from the rest of the tech world.

It’s Season 13 Episode 33 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Mark has been hacking his Steam controller.
    • Martin has been making a very fast home directory.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • New community council elected
    • New LoCo council sought
    • New membership board sought
    • 21.04 is Hirsute Hippo
    • Ubuntu MATE 20.04.1 LTS and Ubuntu MATE 20.10 are available for the Raspberry Pi.
    • Trisquel 9.0 “Etiona” is released
    • Control Philips Hue Lights on Ubuntu with this GNOME Extension
    • Snap speed improvements with new compression algorithm!
  • We discuss the news:
    • It’s a Raspberry Pi. It’s a keyboard.
    • Kim Dotcom can be extradited to US
    • Walmart sacks stock checking robots
    • AI Camera operator confuses bald head for football
  • Image credit:


Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla and Flavors Released
https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/groovy-gorilla-release-notes/15533
https://kubuntu.org/news/kubuntu-groovy-gorilla-20-10-beta-released/
https://ubuntubudgie.org/2020/09/ubuntu-budgie-20-10-release-notes/
https://ubuntu-mate.org/blog/ubuntu-mate-groovy-gorilla-release-notes/
https://wiki.xubuntu.org/releases/20.10/release-notes
https://lubuntu.me/groovy-released/
https://ubuntustudio.org/2020/10/ubuntu-studio-20-10-released/
It’s Fedora Test Week for Kernel 5.9
https://fedoramagazine.org/fedora-kernel-5-9-test-week/
Microsoft Edge Preview Builds Available
https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2020/10/20/microsoft-edge-dev-linux/
Mozilla Reacts to the U.S. v. Google Antitrust Lawsuit
https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2020/10/20/mozilla-reaction-to-u-s-v-google/
Pop!_OS 20.10 Released
https://blog.system76.com/post/632781631953027072/whats-new-in-popos-2010

Tails 4.12 Out
https://tails.boum.org/news/version_4.12/index.en.html

AntiX 19.3 Out
https://antixlinux.com/antix-19-isos-available/

Trisquel 9.0 Etonia Out
https://trisquel.info/en/trisquel-90-etiona-release-announcement-and-100-plans

Linux Kernel 5.10 rc1 Out

This week we get crafty, discuss if Ubuntu is still exciting, bring you some command line love, round up all your wonderful feedback and visit ThinkPad corner.

It’s Season 13 Episode 34 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Alan has been crafting.
  • We discuss if Ubuntu is still exciting and if it should drop GNOME.
  • We share a command line lurve:
    • vramfs – VRAM based file system for Linux
sudo apt -y install gcc libfuse3-dev make opencl-headers
git clone https://github.com/Overv/vramfs
cd vramfs
make
sudo cp bin/vramfs /usr/local/bin

# Mount vram
sudo mkdir -p /mnt/vram
sudo vramfs /mnt/vram 2GB -d 0
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
    • 8BitDo Wireless USB Adapter
    • KDE Quarter Tiling
  • Image credit: Daniel Jensen
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments...

Já votaram no Podcast Ubuntu Portugal em podes.pt? Não? Então não leias mais e vai até https://podes.pt/votar/ escreve Podcast Ubuntu Portugal e clica em VOTAR. Não falhes a aritmética e repete as vezes que conseguires.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://collaboraonline.github.io/
  • https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/oSLO
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/learn-to-code-the-fun-way-no-starch-press-books?partner=pup
  • https://www.jonobacon.com/webinars/content/
  • https://www.twitch.tv/videos/763496146
  • https://podes.pt/votar/

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo...

UPDATE 2020-10-16: This is now fixed.

We are aware that, as of this writing, our website is not 100% https. Our website is hosted by Canonical. There is an open ticket to get everything changed-over, but these things take time. There is nothing the Ubuntu Studio Team can do to speed this along or fix it ourselves. If you explicitly type-in https:// to your web browser, you should get the secure SSL version of our site.

Our download links, merchandise stores, and donation links are unaffected by this as they are hosted elsewhere.

We thank you for your understanding.

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In September, 208.25 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:
  • Abhijith PA did 12.0h (out of 14h assigned), thus carrying over 2h to October.
  • Adrian Bunk did 14h (out of 19.75h assigned), thus carrying over 5.75h to October.
  • Ben Hutchings did 8.25h (out of 16h assigned and 9.75h from August), but gave back 7.75h, thus carrying over 9.75h to October.
  • Brian May did 10h (out of 10h assigned).
  • Chris Lamb did 18h (out of 18h assigned).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 19.75h (out of 19.75h assigned).
  • Holger Levsen did 5h coordinating/managing the LTS team.
  • Markus Koschany did 31.75h (out of 19.75h assigned and 12h from August).
  • Ola Lundqvist did 9.5h (out of 12h from August), thus carrying 2.5h to October.
  • Roberto C. Sánchez did 19.75h (out of 19.75h assigned).
  • Sylvain Beucler did 19.75h (out of 19.75h assigned).
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 19.75h (out of 19.75h assigned).
  • Utkarsh Gupta did 8.75h (out of 19.75h assigned), while he already anticipated the remaining 11h in August.

Evolution of the...

This week we’ve been upgrading our GPUs. We discuss our experiences using IoT devices, bring you some command line love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 30 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been upgrading his computer with a Gigabyte RTX 3090 Gaming OC GPU
  • We discuss our experiences using IoT devices.
  • We share a Command Line Lurve:
    • bpytop – Linux/OSX/FreeBSD resource monitor (BashTOP successor)
bpytop
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
    • https://kupferlauncher.github.io/
    • https://github.com/kupferlauncher/kupfer
  • Image credit: Markus Spiske
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our...


Lenovo Releases 27 Thinkpads and Thinkstations with Ubuntu
https://news.lenovo.com/pressroom/press-releases/lenovo-launches-linux-ready-thinkpad-and-thinkstation-pcs-preinstalled-with-ubuntu/
Amnesia the Dark Descent, Without Assets, Now Open Source
https://frictionalgames.com/2020-09-amnesia-is-now-open-source/
Linux Journal Is Back
https://www.linuxjournal.com/content/linux-journal-back
Microsoft Confirms Edge On Linux in October
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2020/09/22/whats-new-in-web-experiences-ignite-2020-need-to-secure-your-remote-workers-choose-microsoft-edge-as-your-browser-for-business/
Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Out
https://ubports.com/blog/ubport-blogs-news-1/post/ubuntu-touch-ota-13-release-3720

Debian 10.6 Out
https://www.debian.org/News/2020/20200926

Linux Lite 5.2 RC1 Out
https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/release-announcements/linux-lite-5-2-rc1-released/

4MLinux 34 Out
https://4mlinux-releases.blogspot.com/2020/09/4mlinux-340-stable-released.html

Linux Kernel 5.9 RC7 Out
https://lkml.org/lkml/2020/9/27/449

Credits:
Full Circle Magazine
@fullcirclemag
Host: @leochavez
BumperCanonical
Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust
https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic

This week we’ve been upgrading computers and Ebaying stuff. We discuss the Windows Calculator coming to Linux, Microsoft Edge browser coming to Linux, Ubuntu Community Council elections and LibreOffice office getting Yaru icons. We also round up our picks from the general tech news.

It’s Season 13 Episode 31 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been upgrading his computer
    • Alan has been selling stuff on eBay
  • We discuss the community news:
    • The Windows Calculator on Linux with Uno Platform
    • OMG! Ubuntu! goes hands on with Microsoft Edge on Linux
    • Ubuntu Community Council Elections
    • LibreOffice now has a Yaru icon set in Ubuntu 20.10
  • We discuss the news:
    • Apple abandoning CUPS
    • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 now available!
    • Meet the new BBC micro:bit
  • Image credit: Annie Gray
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send...

The releases following an LTS are always a good time ⌚ to make changes the set the future direction 🗺️ of the distribution with an eye on where we want to be for the next LTS release. Therefore, Ubuntu MATE 20.10 ships with that latest MATE Desktop 1.24.1, keeps paces with other developments within Ubuntu (such as Active Directory authentication) and migrated to the Ayatana Indicators project.

If you want bug fixes :bug:, kernel updates :corn:, a new web camera control :movie_camera:, and a new indicator :point_right: experience, then 20.10 is for you :tada:. Ubuntu MATE 20.10 will be supported for 9 months until July 2021. If you need Long Term Support, we recommend you use Ubuntu MATE 20.04 LTS.

Read on to learn more… :point_down:

Ubuntu MATE 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla)Ubuntu MATE 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla)

What’s changed since Ubuntu MATE 20.04?

MATE Desktop

If you follow the Ubuntu MATE twitter account 🐦 you’ll know that MATE Desktop 1.24.1 was recently released. Naturally Ubuntu MATE 20.10 features that maintenance release of MATE Desktop. In addition, we have prepared updated MATE Desktop 1.24.1 packages for Ubuntu MATE 20.04 that are currently in the SRU process. Given the number of MATE packages...


Linux GUI Apps Coming to Windows
https://www.zdnet.com/article/linux-graphical-apps-coming-to-windows-subsystem-for-linux/
Linux Mint 20.1 Will Arrive Mid-December
https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3969
Ubuntu 20.10, Groovy Gorilla [beta], Out
https://9to5linux.com/ubuntu-20-10-beta-is-now-available-for-download

Fedora 33 Beta Out
https://fedoramagazine.org/announcing-the-release-of-fedora-33-beta/

KaOS 2020.09 Out

https://kaosx.us/news/2020/kaos09/

Tails 4.11 Out
https://tails.boum.org/news/version_4.11/index.en.html

Nitrux 1.3.3 Out
https://nxos.org/changelog/changelog-nitrux-1-3-3/

Firefox 81.0.1 Out
https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/81.0.1/releasenotes/

Calibre 5.0 Out
https://calibre-ebook.com/new-in/fourteen

Credits:
Full Circle Magazine
@fullcirclemag
Host: @leochavez
BumperCanonical
Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust
https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

If you’re a prior reader of the blog, you probably know that when I have the opportunity to take a training class, I like to write a review of the course. It’s often hard to find public feedback on trainings, which feels frustrating when you’re spending thousands of dollars on that course.

Last week, I took the “Reverse Engineering with Ghidra” taught by Jeremy Blackthorne (0xJeremy) of the Boston Cybernetics Institute. It was ostensibly offered as part of the Infiltrate Conference, but 2020 being what it is, there was no conference and it was just an online training. Unfortunately for me, it was being run on East Coast time and I’m on the West Coast, so I got to enjoy some early mornings.

I won’t bury the lede here – on the whole, the course was a high-quality experience taught by an instructor who is clearly both passionate and experienced with technical instruction. I would highly recommend this course if you have little experience in reverse engineering and want to get bootstrapped on performing reversing with Ghidra. You absolutely do need to have some understanding of how programs work – memory sections, control flow, how data and code is represented in memory,...

KDE Plasma-Desktop

The Kubuntu community are delighted to announce the release of Kubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla. For this release Kubuntu ships with Plasma 5.19.5 and Applications 20.08. The desktop carries the fresh new look and gorgeous wallpaper design selected by the KDE Visual Design Group.

 

Cloud Ready

With the rapid growth in cloud native technologies the kubuntu community recognise that Kubuntu users need access to cloud and container technologies.
Kubuntu 20.10 also includes LXD 4.6 and MicroK8s 1.19 for resilient micro clouds, small clusters of servers providing VMs and Kubernetes.

Kubuntu 20.10 includes KDE Applications 20.08.

Dolphin, KDE’s file explorer, for example, adds previews for more types of files and improvements to the way long names are summarized, allowing you to better see what each file is or does. Dolphin also improves the way you can reach files and directories on remote machines, making working from home a much smoother experience. It also remembers the location you were viewing the last time you closed it, making it easier to pick up from where you left off.

For those of you into photography, KDE’s professional photo management...

The Ubuntu OpenStack team at Canonical is pleased to announce the general availability of OpenStack Victoria on Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive. Details of the Victoria release can be found at:  https://www.openstack.org/software/victoria.

To get access to the Ubuntu Victoria packages:

Ubuntu 20.10

OpenStack Victoria is available by default for installation on Ubuntu 20.10.

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

The Ubuntu Cloud Archive for OpenStack Victoria can be enabled on Ubuntu 20.04 by running the following command:

sudo add-apt-repository cloud-archive:victoria

The Ubuntu Cloud Archive for Victoria includes updates for:

aodh, barbican, ceilometer, cinder, designate, designate-dashboard, glance, gnocchi, heat, heat-dashboard, horizon, ironic, keystone, magnum, manila, manila-ui, masakari, mistral, murano, murano-dashboard, networking-arista, networking-bagpipe, networking-baremetal, networking-bgpvpn, networking-hyperv, networking-l2gw, networking-mlnx, networking-odl, networking-sfc, neutron, neutron-dynamic-routing, neutron-vpnaas, nova, octavia, octavia-dashboard, openstack-trove, trove-dashboard,...

The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 20.10, code-named “Groovy Gorilla”. This marks Ubuntu Studio’s 28th release. This release is a regular release, and as such it is supported for nine months until July 2021.

Since it’s just out, you may experience some issues, so you might want to wait a bit before upgrading. Please see the release notes for a complete list of changes and known issues.

You can download Ubuntu Studio 20.10 from our download page.

If you find Ubuntu Studio useful, please consider making a contribution.

Upgrading

Due to the change in desktop environment this release, direct upgrades to Ubuntu Studio 20.10 are not supported. We recommend a clean install for this release:

  1. Backup your home directory (/home/{username})
  2. Install Ubuntu Studio 20.10
  3. Copy the contents of your backed-up home directory to your new home directory.

New This Release

The biggest new feature is the switch of desktop environment to KDE Plasma. We believe this will provide a more cohesive and integrated experience for many of the applications that we include by default. We have previously outlined our reasoning for this switch...

On the 22nd October 2020, Canonical released an Ubuntu Desktop image optimised for the Raspberry Pi. The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s 4GB and 8GB boards work out of the box with everything users expect from an Ubuntu Desktop. It is our honour to contribute an optimised Ubuntu Desktop image to the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s mission to put the power of computing into people’s hands all over the world.

<noscript> <img alt="" src="https://res.cloudinary.com/canonical/image/fetch/f_auto,q_auto,fl_sanitize,c_fill,w_720/https://ubuntu.com/wp-content/uploads/2bc4/GG_blog-post-RPi_3.png" width="720" /> </noscript>

The right hardware

Since the Raspberry Pi Foundation began its mission, users have been using their boards to run everything in their lives. Whether that’s making DIY devices, learning to code or building products, it was made possible by Raspberry Pis. But running a full-featured, LTS desktop that can handle the expectations of everyday users, without technical knowledge, wasn’t really possible. Until recently.   

The Raspberry Pi 4 debuted with the graphics, RAM and connectivity needed for a Linux workstation. Users finally had the hardware to make a Raspberry Pi into a...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 654 for the week of October 18 – 24, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) released
  • Corrections to point release publications of current LTSes
  • Ubuntu Glibc News
  • Welcome New Members and Developers
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • OpenStack Victoria for Ubuntu 20.10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS
  • Ubuntu Cloud News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Press
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

Thanks to all the Ubuntu Members that voted in the election, I am proud to announce our new Ubuntu Community Council!

The full results of the election can be seen here but our winners are:

  • Walter Lapchynski
  • Lina Elizabeth Porras Santana
  • Thomas Ward
  • José Antonio Rey
  • Nathan Haines
  • Torsten Franz
  • Erich Eichmeyer

Congratulations to all of them! They will serve on the Council for the next two years.

Should there be any pressing business that the Council should deal with, especially given the long absence of the Council, please contact the Council mailing list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Again, thanks to everyone involved for making Ubuntu and its community better!

Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, Lubuntu 20.10 has been released! With the codename Groovy Gorilla, Lubuntu 20.10 is the 19th release of Lubuntu, the fifth release of Lubuntu with LXQt as the default desktop environment. Support lifespan Lubuntu 20.10 will be supported until July 2021. Our main focus will be on […]

Já votaram no Podcast Ubuntu Portugal em podes.pt? Não? Então não leias mais e vai até https://podes.pt/votar/ escreve Podcast Ubuntu Portugal e clica em VOTAR. Não falhes a aritmética e repete as vezes que conseguires.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://forum.pine64.org/showthread.php?tid=11772
  • https://forum.snapcraft.io/t/call-for-suggestions-featured-snaps-friday-9th-october-2020/20384
  • https://github.com/ubports/ubports-installer/releases
  • https://joplinapp.org/
  • https://snapcraft.io/joplin-james-carroll
  • https://snapstats.org/snaps/flameshot
  • https://twitter.com/m_wimpress/status/1314315931468914689
  • https://twitter.com/m_wimpress/status/1314497286425268224
  • https://twitter.com/stgraber/status/1314625640629448705
  • https://twitter.com/thefxtec/status/1314550781509541889
  • https://twitter.com/thepine64/status/1314911896177389570
  • https://ubuntu.com/blog/how-to-make-snaps-and-configuration-management-tools-work-together
  • https://www.meshtastic.org/
  • https://www.npmjs.com/package/android-tools-bin
  • https://www.pine64.org/2020/10/15/update-new-hacktober-gear/
  • https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuP6xPt0WTeZu32CkQPpbvA/
  • https://podes.pt/
  • Apoios

    Podem apoiar o podcast usando os...

Security and performance are often mutually exclusive concepts. A great user experience is one that manages to blend the two in a way that does not compromise on robust, solid foundations of security on one hand, and a fast, responsive software interaction on the other.

Snaps are self-contained applications, with layered security, and as a result, sometimes, they may have reduced perceived performance compared to those same applications offered via traditional Linux packaging mechanisms. We are well aware of this phenomenon, and we have invested significant effort and time in resolving any speed gaps, while keeping security in mind. Last year, we talked about improved snap startup times following fontconfig cache optimization. Now, we want to tell you about another major milestone – the use of a new compression algorithm for snaps offers 2-3x improvement in application startup times!

LZO and XZ algorithms

By default, snaps are packaged as a compressed, read-only squashfs filesystem using the XZ algorithm. This results in a high level of compression but consequently requires more processing power to uncompress and expand the filesystem for use. On the desktops, users may...

After a few weeks of development and testing, we are proud to finally announce that Git protocol v2 is available at Launchpad! But what are the improvements in the protocol itself, and how can you benefit from that?

The git v2 protocol was released a while ago, in May 2018, with the intent of simplifying git over HTTP transfer protocol, allowing extensibility of git capabilities, and reducing the network usage in some operations.

For the end user, the main clear benefit is the bandwidth reduction: in the previous version of the protocol, when one does a “git pull origin master”, for example, even if you have no new commits to fetch from the remote origin, git server would first “advertise” to the client all refs (branches and tags) available. In big repositories with hundreds or thousands of refs, this simple handshake operation could consume a lot of bandwidth and time to communicate a bunch of data that would potentially be discarded by the client after.

In the v2 protocol, this waste is no longer present: the client now has the ability to filter which refs it wants to know about before the server starts advertising it.

The v2 protocol is not the default on git...

This week we have been writing a computer game. We take the tiling window manager challenge and discuss our experiences, bring you some command line love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 28 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Alan has been writing a game.
  • We discuss our experiences using tiling window managers.
    • Alan: Regolith
    • Mark: FancyZones
    • Martin: gTile
  • We share a command line lurve:
    • duf – Disk Usage/Free Utility
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
  • Image credit: Brett Jordan
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

  • Join us in the Ubuntu Podcast Telegram...

We are pleased to announce that the beta images for Lubuntu 20.10 have been released! While we have reached the bugfix-only stage of our development cycle, these images are not meant to be used in a production system. We highly recommend joining our development group or our forum to let us know about any issues. […]

This month I started working on ways to make hosting access easier for Debian Developers. I also did some work and planning for the MiniDebConf Online Gaming Edition that we’ll likely announce within the next 1-2 days. Just a bunch of content that needs to be fixed and a registration bug then I think we’ll be ready to send out the call for proposals.

In the meantime, here’s my package uploads and sponsoring for September:

2020-09-07: Upload package calamares (3.2.30-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-09-07: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-dash-to-panel (39-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-09-08: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-draw-on-your-screen (6.2-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-09-08: Sponsor package sqlobject (3.8.0+dfsg-2) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-09-08: Sponsor package bidict (0.21.0-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-09-11: Upload package catimg (2.7.0-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-09-16: Sponsor package gamemode (1.6-1) for Debian unstable (Games team request).

2020-09-21: Sponsor package qosmic (1.6.0-3) for Debian unstable (Debian Mentors / e-mail request).

2020-09-22: Upload package...

This blog post is part two of a four part series

  1. Overview, summary and motivation
  2. Porting approach with various details, examples and problems I ran into along the way
  3. Performance optimizations
  4. Building Rust code into a C library as drop-in replacement

In this part I’ll go through the actual porting process of the libebur128 C code to Rust, the approach I’ve chosen with various examples and a few problems I was running into.

It will be rather technical. I won’t explain details about how the C code works but will only focus on the aspects that are relevant for porting to Rust, otherwise this blog post would become even longer than it already is.

Porting

With the warnings out of the way, let’s get started. As a reminder, the code can be found on GitHub and you can also follow along the actual chronological porting process by going through the git history there. It’s not very different to what will follow here but just in case you prefer looking at diffs instead.

Approach

The approach I’ve taken is basically the same that Federico took for librsvg or Joe Neeman’s took for nnnoiseless:

  1. Start with the C code and safe Rust bindings around the C API
  2. Look for a function or component...

The Plasma Desktop Environment

The beta of Groovy Gorilla (to become 20.10) has now been released, and is available for download.

This milestone features images for Kubuntu and other Ubuntu flavours.

Pre-releases of the Groovy Gorilla are not recommended for:

  • Anyone needing a stable system
  • Regular users who are not aware of pre-release issues
  • Anyone uncomfortable running a possibly frequently broken system
  • Anyone in a production environment with data or workflows that need to be reliable

They are, however, recommended for:

  • Regular users who want to help us test by finding, reporting, and/or fixing bugs
  • Kubuntu, KDE, and Qt developers
  • Other Ubuntu flavour developers

The Beta includes some software updates that are ready for broader testing. However, it is an early set of images, so you should expect some bugs.

You can:

  • Read more information about the Kubuntu 20.10 Beta in the Release Notes.
  • Read the full text of the main Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla announcement.

The Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla Release notes will give more details of changes to the Ubuntu base.

Have you ever wanted to donate to your favorite multimedia-based operating system development, but haven’t been able to? Well, now you can!

Today, we have launched our Donate button. Donations can be made on a one-time or monthly basis.

Donations will go toward ongoing development costs to those most actively participating in the project. As an example, one developer, project leader Erich Eickmeyer, worked nearly full-time to transition the desktop environment for 20.10. We would like to be able to supplement him with at least a part-time income for his ongoing contributions to the project. Others that are highly active in the project could benefit too

If you are feeling generous and feel as if Ubuntu Studio has been valuable to you, and would like to help contribute to ongoing development, click on the Donate button above.

Other methods of donating are coming soon, such as launching a Patreon campaign.

Thank you so much for your donations!

The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the beta release of Ubuntu Studio 20.10, codenamed Groovy Gorilla.

While this beta is reasonably free of any showstopper DVD build or installer bugs, you may find some bugs within. This image is, however, reasonably representative of what you will find when Ubuntu Studio 20.10 is released on October 22, 2020.

Please note: Due to the change in desktop environment, directly upgrading to Ubuntu Studio 20.10 is not supported and will not be supported. See the Release Notes for more information.

Images can be obtained from this link: https://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/20.10/beta/

Full updated information is available in the Release Notes.

New Features

Ubuntu Studio 20.10 is the first release of Ubuntu Studio to use the KDE Plasma Desktop Environment by default. This is a solid, stable desktop environment chosen due to its incredible customizability, low memory footprint, and many more reasons. The KDE community and Ubuntu Studio have a unique synergy in that they are both striving to be the choice of artists of all kinds, so this is an ideal development relationship going forward.

Jack Mixer has...

Já votaram no Podcast Ubuntu Portugal em podes.pt? Não? Então não leias mais e vai até https://podes.pt/votar/ escreve Podcast Ubuntu Portugal e clica em VOTAR. Não falhes a aritmética e repete as vezes que conseguires.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/learn-to-code-the-fun-way-no-starch-press-books?partner=pup
  • https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/OpenSSH/Cookbook/
  • https://podes.pt/votar/

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

A música do genérico é: “Won’t...

Voting has begun for the Ubuntu Community Council election. We will be voting in all seven seats for a two year term. All Ubuntu Members are eligible to vote and should receive their ballot by email.

The candidates are as follows:

  • Stephen Michael Kellat (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Nathan Haines (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • José Antonio Rey (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Walter Lapchynski (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Wild Man (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Dustin Krysak (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Thomas Ward (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Torsten Franz (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Jhosman Lizarazo (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Lina Elizabeth Porras Santana (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Erich Eickmeyer (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)
  • Khairul Aizat Kamarudzzaman (Launchpad, Ubuntu Wiki)

In the event that you are an Ubuntu Member but have not already received your ballot, first check your spam folders. The email should have the following identifying headers:

From: "Walter Lapchynski (CIVS poll supervisor)" <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Sender: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Reply-To: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: Poll: Ubuntu Community Council election 2020
X-Mailer: CIVS

If you still cannot find your ballot, it is likely because...

Set up and run your own homelab with the LXD Ubuntu Appliance. Spin up and manage virtual machines (VMs) and containers, run and test workloads across platforms and architectures, and rest assured of security and updates with Ubuntu Core. Follow the tutorial to get started or read on to learn why you might care.     

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Why should I care?

Running or testing workloads at home, safely, still has issues. There are lots of ways to do it, maybe you have a dedicated homelab in your basement, or you run workloads on your main machine, or something in between. But every method has drawbacks. People want something that doesn’t take up racks of space, that is quiet enough not to be in a different room, and won’t cost an arm and a leg.

Previously you had to use cloud technology, fork out the cash, or let go of your homelab dreams forever. But this all changes with the LXD Ubuntu Appliance. A smaller, quieter and comparably inexpensive way to spin up and manage all the VMs and containers you...

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