What is an operating system?

An operating system (OS) is the Application Which, after being initially loaded into the computer by a boot program, oversees all the other application programs in a computer. The application programs make use of the working system by making Furthermore, users can interact directly with the operating system Via a user interface like a command line or a graphical user interface (GUI).

9 Popular Mobile Operating Systems

Android OS (Google Inc.) ...
2. Bada (Samsung Electronics) ...
BlackBerry OS (Research In Motion) ...
iPhone OS / iOS (Apple) ...
MeeGo OS (Nokia and Intel) ...
Palm OS (Garnet OS) ...
Symbian OS (Nokia) ...
webOS (Palm/HP) ...

Types of operating systems.

Operating systems normally include pre-loaded on almost any Computer you purchase. Many men and women use the operating system which comes with their computer, however it is possible to update or perhaps alter operating systems. The three most frequent operating systems for personal computers are Microsoft Windows, macOS, and Linux. A GUI enables you to use your mouse to click on icons, switches , and menus, and that which is clearly displayed on the display by means of a combo of images and text. Each operating system's GUI includes a different feel and look, so if you Switch to another operating system it might appear unfamiliar at first. However, modern operating systems have been made to be effortless to utilize , and the majority of the fundamental principles are exactly the same.

Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
macOS
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
Linux
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.
Operating systems for mobile devices
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.
A custom and global shortcut key to mute / unmute yourself in Zoom or Google Meet

Just like everyone else, 2020 was the year of having more and more video-conference calls. How many times did we struggle to find the meeting window during a call, and say “Sorry, I was on mute”? I tried to address the pain and ended up with the following setup.

xdotool

xdotool is a great automation tool for X, and it can search a window, activate it, and simulate keyboard input. That’s a perfect match for the use case here.

Here is an example command for Google Meet.

$ xdotool search --name '^Meet - .+ - Chromium$' 
    windowactivate --sync 
    key ctrl+d

In the chained commands, it does:

  1. search windows named like Meet - <MEETING_ID> - Chromium
  2. activate the first window passed by the previous line and wait until it gets active (--sync)
  3. send a keystroke as Ctrl+D, which is the default shortcut in Meet

By the way, my main browser is Firefox, but I have to use Chromium to join Meet calls since it tends to have less CPU utilization.

You can do something similar for Zoom with Alt+A.

$ xdotool search --name '^Zoom Meeting$' 
    windowactivate --sync 
    key...

¿Será buena para Linux una más que factible migración de x86 a ARM? ¿Significará la muerte de Linux? Creemos que se avecinan tiempos oscuros… Y el navegador Edge llega a Linux. Escúchanos en: Ivoox Telegram Youtube Y en tu cliente de podcast habitual con el RSS

In no particular order:

  • The new year began without a civil emergency locally. After all that has happened lately that is a bit of a relief.

  • The garage studio is developing a bit of a moisture problem. The video cameras that we have for filming online church services don’t work well with such high levels of moisture. Efforts are in progress to break down the studio and move it inside the house. Where exactly this will all be set up and how it will function is frankly beyond me at the moment.

  • Editing on the third story continues. The second reader has had a chance to look at it. Apparently the ending is a wee bit abrupt, there are some story gaps, and I apparently left some plot development off-stage. More writing will be done. Some folks out there use dedicated writing programs geared towards authors but I am using Visual Studio Code and the novel package on CTAN as well as the markdown package on CTAN.

  • People forget that the Comprehensive TeX Archive Network has packages covering the use of different types of markup within LaTeX apparently.

  • As much as I would prefer to avoid the matter it looks like I have to consider relocating at some point in 2021. That’s...

There have been no new posts on this blog for the last 20 months, so I am finally putting the site on hiatus.

The post On Hiatus appeared first on LIEBERBIBER.

As you may know, I am Qt 5 maintainer in Debian. Maintaning Qt means not only bumping the version each time a new version is released, but also making sure Qt builds successfully on all architectures that are supported in Debian (and for some submodules, the automatic tests pass).

An important sort of build failures are endianness specific failures. Most widely used architectures (x86_64, aarch64) are little endian. However, Debian officially supports one big endian architecture (s390x), and unofficially a few more ports are provided, such as ppc64 and sparc64.

Unfortunately, Qt upstream does not have any big endian machine in their CI system, so endianness issues get noticed only when the packages fail to build on our build daemons. In the last years I have discovered and fixed some such issues in various parts of Qt, so I decided to write a post to illustrate how to write really cross-platform C/C++ code.

Issue 1: the WebP image format handler (code review)

The relevant code snippet is:

if (srcImage.format() != QImage::Format_ARGB32)
    srcImage = srcImage.convertToFormat(QImage::Format_ARGB32);
// ...
if (!WebPPictureImportBGRA(&picture, srcImage.bits(),...

Tornamos histórias enfadonhas em aventuras fantásticas, acontecimentos cinzentos em verdadeiros contos de fadas, ou então falamos só sobre Ubuntu e outras cenas… Aqui fica mais um episódio no vosso podcast preferido.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://events.ccc.de/
  • https://support.logi.com/hc/en-us/articles/360025903194
  • https://podcastindex.org/podcast/765561
  • https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/podcast-ubuntu-portugal-530916
  • https://github.com/subspacecloud/subspace
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/hacking-101-no-starch-press-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/cybersecurity-cryptography-wiley-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/infrastructure-ops-oreilly-books?partner?PUP
  • http://keychronwireless.refr.cc/tiagocarrondo
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop?aff_ref=3

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou...

The year 2020 was quite extraordinary, because a lot of things developed quite differently from how they were supposed to because of the Covid-19 crisis. Even though a lot of things happen virtually at Ubuntu, it also had an impact on my Ubuntu life.

Every year I attend a few trade fairs to present Ubuntu and/or give talks. In 2020, this only took place virtually and in a very limited way for me. In March, the Chemnitzer Linuxtage were cancelled and one fair after the other was cancelled.

In my home town I go to a Fablab where we also work on Ubuntu. After the meetings in January and February, this was also cancelled. Now and then this still took place virtually, but somehow it didn’t create the same atmosphere as when we met in real life.

With the team members of the German-speaking Ubuntu forum (ubuntuusers.de) we organise a team meeting every year, which is always very funny and partly productive. In 2020 it had to be cancelled. Since I have also reduced my other contacts to help contain the virus, I have only met two people from the Ubuntu environment in real life since March.

But, of course, Ubuntu life was also progressing in 2020. The whole year I had the...

Now that both halves of the Brexit Deal (Withdrawal Agreement and Trade Deal) have been written the UK is finally in a position to spend some months having a discourse about their merits before having a referendum on whether to go with it or go with the status quo. Alas the broken democratic setup won’t allow that as there was a referendum over 4 years ago without the basics needed for discussion. One lesson that needs to be learnt, but I haven’t seen anyone propose, is to require referendums to have pre-written legislation or international agreement text on what is being implemented.

This on top of the occasionally discussed fixes needed to democracy around transparency of campaigning funds, proper fines when they steal data, banning or limiting online advertising, transparency around advertising and proper fines for campaigns that over-spend.

The new GB <-> UK setup will of course remove freedoms and add vast amounts of new bureaucracy. It might get three of the UK’s countries out of the properly run court of the ECJ but for what end? To be replaced with endless committees discussing the exact same points and the threat of tariffs when standards diverge. Making...

No primeiro episódio gravado em 2021, fazemos as nossas previsões pessoais para no ano para o Ubuntu, Software Livre e tecnologia um relacionada, e ainda discutimos as previsões apresentadas por ouvintes!

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://ansol.org/dominio-publico-2021
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/linux-apress-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/cybersecurity-cryptography-wiley-books?partner=PUP
  • http://keychronwireless.refr.cc/tiagocarrondo
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop?aff_ref=3

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a...

Branches are an under-used but important feature of the Snap Store publishing capabilities. Indeed as I’m writing this post, I’ve never had a need to use the feature, and I’ve been publishing snaps for four and a half years. Let’s fix that!

Start with acorns

The rationale for branches is simple. Each snap in the Snap Store has a default track called ‘latest’ in which there are four channels named ‘stable’, ‘beta’, ‘candidate’ and ‘edge’. These are all typical buckets in which snaps are published for an extended period, perhaps months or maybe even years. Branches on the other hand are short-lived silos for publishing snaps. 

As a developer you may have a published application which has bugs users experience but you cannot reproduce. A temporary branch can be used to hold a test build of the application you’re working on to solve a bug.

If you’re tracking and fixing multiple bugs in parallel, each can have their own separate branch under the same snap name in the Snap Store. Branches are ‘hidden’, so unless someone guesses the name of it, users aren’t going to stumble upon potentially broken bug-fix builds of your application. 

Branches only live for 30 days, after which they’re...

Over the past year there has been focused work on improving the test coverage of the Linux Kernel with stress-ng.  Increased test coverage exercises more kernel code and hence improves the breadth of testing, allowing us to be more confident that more corner cases are being handled correctly.

The test coverage has been improved in several ways:

  1. testing more system calls; most system calls are being now exercised
  2. adding more ioctl() command tests
  3. exercising system call error handling paths
  4. exercise more system call options and flags
  5. keeping track of new features added to recent kernels and adding stress test cases for these
  6. adding support for new architectures (RISC-V for example)

Each stress-ng release is run with various stressor options against the latest kernel (built with gcov enabled).  The gcov data is processed with lcov to produce human readable kernel source code containing coverage annotations to help inform where to add more test coverage for the next release cycle of stress-ng. 

Linux Foundation sponsored Piyush Goyal for 3 months to add test cases that exercise system call test failure paths and I appreciate this help in improving stress-ng. I finally completed this...


Lubuntu 21.04 Artwork Contest Open
https://lubuntu.me/lubuntu-hirsute-hippo-21-04-artwork-contest/
Ubuntu’s Switch to LZO in Snapd
https://ubuntu.com//blog/why-lzo-was-chosen-as-the-new-compression-method
Ubuntu’s Snap Theming Will See Changes for the Better
https://ubuntu.com//blog/snaps-and-themes-on-the-path-to-seamless-desktop-integration‘
GTK4 Is Available After 4 Years In Development
https://blog.gtk.org/2020/12/16/gtk-4-0/
XFCE 4.16 Out with New Icons
https://xfce.org/about/news/?post=1608595200
A Rocky Linux Update
https://rockylinux.org/posts/community-update-december-2020/
Deepin 20.1, A Big Jump Forward
https://www.deepin.org/en/2020/12/28/deepin-20-1-details-make-perfection/
Linux Mint 20.1 Ulyssa Beta Out
https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3989

Rescuezilla 2.1.2 Out
https://github.com/rescuezilla/rescuezilla/releases/tag/2.1.2

Manjaro ARM 20.12 Out
https://forum.manjaro.org/t/manjaro-arm-20-12-released/43709

Linux Kernel 5.11 rc1 Out
https://www.lkml.org/lkml/2020/12/27/180

Bash 5.1 Out
https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/info-gnu/2020-12/msg00003.html

Darktable 3.4 Out
https://github.com/darktable-org/darktable/releases/tag/release-3.4.0

Thunderbird 78.6.0 Out

In episode 100 of Late Night Linux I talked a little bit about trying out Pi Hole and AdGuard to replace my home grown ad blocker based on dnsmasq and a massive hosts file.

I came down in favour of Pi Hole for a couple of reasons but the deciding factor was that Pi Hole felt a bit more open and that it was built on top of dnsmasq which allowed me to reuse config for TFTP which netboots some devices which needed it.

Now that I’ve been using Pi Hole for a few months I have a much better understanding of its limitations and the big one for me is performance. Not the performance when servicing DNS requests but performance when querying the stats data, when reloading block lists and when enabling and disabling certain lists. I suspect a lot of the problems I was having is down to flaky SD cards.

I fully expect that for most people this will never be a problem, but for me it was an itch I wanted to scratch, so here’s what I did:

Through the actually quite generous Amazon Alexa AWS Credits promotion I have free money to spend on AWS services, so I spun up a t2.micro EC2 instance (1 vCPU, 1GB RAM – approx £10 a month) running Ubuntu.

I installed Pi Hole on that...

Here’s a list of some Debian packaging work for December 2020.

2020-12-01: Sponsor package mangohud (0.6.1-1) for Debian unstable (mentors.debian.net request).

2020-12-01: Sponsor package spyne (2.13.16-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-12-01: Sponsor package python-xlrd (1.2.0-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-12-01: Sponsor package buildbot for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-12-08: Upload package calamares (3.2.35.1-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-09: Upload package btfs (2.23-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-09: Upload package feed2toot (0.15-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-09: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-harddisk-led (23-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-10: Upload package feed2toot (0.16-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-10: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-harddisk-led (24-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-13: Upload package xabacus (8.3.1-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-14: Upload package python-aniso8601 (8.1.0-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-19: Upload package rootskel-gtk (1.42) to Debian unstable.

2020-12-21: Sponsor package goverlay (0.4.3-1) for Debian unstable...

I have a bunch of Ubuntu machines on my local network at home. They all periodically need to check for updates then download & install them. Rather than have them all reach out to the official mirrors externally to my network, I decided to run my own mirror internally. This post is just a set of notes for anyone else who might be looking to do something similar. I also do a lot of software building, and re-building, which pulls all kinds of random libraries, compilers and other packages from the archive.

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 665 for the week of January 3 – 9, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Call for nominations for the Local Communities Council
  • Call for Nomination: Local Communities Research Committee
  • First Hirsute Hippo test rebuild (and GCC related test rebuilds)
  • Welcome New Members and Developers
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • My GNOME Tweaks
  • Ubuntu Cloud News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

TL;DR

I'm grateful for translations by translators. But translating everything causes icons to break. Ubuntu MATE 20.04 has several broken icons and most of them are fixed in Ubuntu MATE 20.10 already.

Advice: Please do NOT translate the 'Icon' text, just leave that translation blank (""). Copy/pasting the English text will cause superfluous lines in .desktop files and might cause additional work later (if the original name is updated, you will need to copy and paste that string again). So getting a 100% translation score, might even be non-optimal.

Ubuntu MATE 20.04.1 with broken icons

You probably know the feeling of being the IT guy for your family (in this specific case, my mother-in-law). Her Linux laptop needed to be upgraded to the latest LTS, so I did that for her.

Back when she got the laptop, I installed a non-LTS release. That was required, otherwise her brand spanking new hardware, wouldn't have worked correctly.

I tried using the GUI to upgrade the system, but that didn't work. Usually I live in the terminal, so I quickly went to my comfort zone. I noticed the repositories were not available anymore, of course, this was not an LTS. That meant also that...

Another in a series of “I have identified a problem here!”. I appear have quite a few video games. More than I can probably play in my time left on Earth. Let’s set aside all the retro games I have for a moment, and consider only the ones that run on my primary computer, a PC. To be clear, I’m only talking about ‘native’ games. Aside: I hate the word ‘native’ in this context, because what’s native?

So, I was awarded a medal.

OpenUK, who are a non-profit organisation supporting open source software, hardware, and data, and are run by Amanda Brock, have published the honours list for 2021 of what they call “100 top influencers across the UK’s open technology communities”. One of them is me, which is rather nice. One’s not supposed to blow one’s own trumpet at a time like this, but to borrow a line from Edmund Blackadder it’s nice to let people know that you have a trumpet.

There are a bunch of names on this list that I suspect anyone in a position to read this might recognise. Andrew Wafaa at ARM, Neil McGovern of GNOME, Ben Everard the journalist and Chris Lamb the DPL and Jonathan Riddell at KDE. Jeni Tennison and Jimmy Wales and Simon Wardley. There are people I’ve worked with or spoken alongside or had a pint with or all of those things — Mark Shuttleworth, Rob McQueen, Simon Phipps, Michael Meeks. And those I know as friends, which makes them doubly worthy: Alan Pope, Laura Czajkowski, Dave Walker, Joe Ressington, Martin Wimpress. And down near the bottom of the alphabetical list, there’s me, slotted in between Terence Eden and Sir Tim Berners-Lee. I’ll take that...

The Community Council has concluded that we need a new evaluation of the Ubuntu Local Communities project itself and this should be done by a Local Communities Research Committee.

You can read the thoughts behind this call and what we are looking for on the Community Hub:
https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/local-communities-research-committee/20186

If you think you can and want to make a contribution to Ubuntu here, please send your nomination to community-council at lists.ubuntu.com.

Nominations are now open and will close on Saturday, January 23, 2021 at 23:59 UTC. After that, the Community Council will review the submissions and appoint the Local Communities Research Committee.

Originally posted to the loco-contacts mailing list on Fri Jan 8 20:55:02 UTC 2021 by Torsten Franz

<noscript> <img alt="" src="https://res.cloudinary.com/canonical/image/fetch/f_auto,q_auto,fl_sanitize,c_fill,w_720/https://ubuntu.com/wp-content/uploads/ccb7/Screenshot-from-2021-01-12-19-24-04.png" width="720" /> </noscript>

Assuring the security of PostgreSQL and all open source database systems is critical as many learned with the PgMiner botnet attacks in December 2020. Having an understanding of, and visibility into, how these attacks happen and following standard best practices is the best way to make sure that your data is not at risk.

This blog details the latest security issue with PostgreSQL, how to fix/prevent these attacks and how to ensure security of your PostgreSQL database instances.

Overview and prevention of the PgMiner botnet attacks

Attacks like the PgMiner botnet attack essentially scrape across the Internet looking for misconfigured PostgreSQL servers. This process involves scanning blocks of IP addresses, identifying Postgres servers and then attempting to brute force attack the authentication on those servers. 

The good news for Ubuntu users, is that Ubuntu Server has a secure experience with Postgres out of the box, which is well-documented in

Ho ho ho! Tornamos histórias enfadonhas em aventuras fantásticas, acontecimentos cinzentos em verdadeiros contos de fadas, ou então falamos só sobre Ubuntu e outras cenas… Aqui fica mais um episódio no vosso podcast preferido.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://acloudguru.com/course/cloud-native-certified-kubernetes-administrator-cka
  • https://www.keychron.com/products/keychron-k1-wireless-mechanical-keyboard
  • http://keychronwireless.refr.cc/tiagocarrondo
  • https://www.amazon.es/dp/B07JCF1TQ4/
  • https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2020/12/mozilla-firefox-84-released
  • https://www.zdnet.com/article/firefox-to-ship-network-partitioning-as-a-new-anti-tracking-defense/
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/hacking-101-no-starch-press-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/infrastructure-ops-oreilly-books?partner=PUP
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop?aff_ref=3

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15...

This week we have been fixing network and audio noise and playing Hotshot Racing. We look back and celebrate the good things that happened in 2020, bring you some GUI love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 40 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Alan has been fixing network and audio noise.
    • Martin has been playing Hotshot Racing.
  • We discuss a segment.
    • E01 – March 24th
      • The World Cup of Ubuntu Desktops has been won by Hardy Heron
    • E03 – April 7th
      • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa)
      • Ubuntu Testing Week
    • E07 – May 5th
      • Mark Shuttleworth speaks
      • Ubuntu 20.10 will be “Groovy Gorilla”
    • E11 – June 2nd
      • Lenovo Makes Entire Workstation Range Available with Ubuntu
      • 8GB Raspeberry Pi 4 launched
    • E17 – July 15th
      • Flutter comes to desktop linux
    • E21 – August 11th
      • The National Museum of Computing launches virtual tour
    • E23 – August 25th
      • Jupiter Broadcasting is independent again
    • E25 – September 8th
      • HP Z series on Ubuntu
    • E29 – October 6th
      • The Failed OUYA Game Console Seeing Work For Mainline Linux Kernel Support
    • E31 – October 20th
      • The...

In no particular order:

  • Contribution efforts on my part are held back due to other matters requiring attention. I know LP Bug #1905548 needs attention. This is just the time of year when not much gets accomplished usually anyhow.

  • Like many at churches across the United States I have not ever had a desire to emulate Kenneth Copeland or other televangelists. What do you call it when it is either not prudent or not possible for a church to meet in-person which results in services having to be streamed online? Outside an outlet like EWTN it would certainly seem like having to engage in televangelism of a sort after all. Various open source pieces of software have been used as I end up producing things in the garage. Those results are presently posted to YouTube based upon surveying the served audience and what online services they utilize. It is not as if I am operating a numbers station.

  • Using Ubuntu via the Windows Subsystem for Linux has been exciting. It makes having to use a Windows 10 laptop quite bearable.

  • The website of Erie Looking Productions is offline as I am trying to figure out where I want to move its hosting to. I want to start distributing hosting of my...

Everyone wants fast applications. Recently, we provided a mechanism to make snap applications launch faster by using the LZO format. We introduced this change because users reported desktop snaps starting more slowly than the same applications distributed via traditional, native Linux packaging formats like Deb or RPM.

After a thorough investigation, we pinpointed the compression method as the primary slowdown. Once we introduced the change, some users started wondering why we chose LZO as the new compression method for snaps, given that there are “better” algorithms available. Here, we want to take you through the journey of understanding why we picked LZO, and what is next for the snap compression story.

The old way

Previously, the only supported compression format for snaps was XZ. This decision was borne out of two main determining factors: compatibility and size. One of the primary delivery targets for snaps (in addition to desktop users) is IoT devices, and so for those, we wanted to have the smallest possible size. Additionally, cross-distro support is very important with snaps, and so we also wanted to make sure that the compression format chosen would be compatible...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 662 for the week of December 13 – 19, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Technical Board elections in progress
  • Welcome New Members and Developers
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Mir in 2020
  • Spotify on the Raspberry Pi 400
  • Lubuntu Hirsute Hippo 21.04 Artwork Contest
  • Straightforward Linux Backups with rsnapshot
  • Other Community News
  • Ubuntu Cloud News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

The trick: Read the manual. I pay for 100Mb/s downstream Internet connection at home. For months I’ve been getting around 50Mb/s at my desk, and 100Mb/s over wifi on my phone, under optimal conditions. Here’s how I ‘fixed’ the ‘slow’ Internet (essentially LAN speed) connection at my desk. I use a bunch of TP-LINK “Powerline” adapters around the house to get wired networking to each room. “Well, that’s your first problem, Alan.

I currently run Ubuntu 20.10 on my main desktop PC. GNOME Shell is the default desktop, and while it’s great, one very useful feature is the ability to supplement or alter the default behaviour with extensions and other add-ons. Ubuntu ships with a couple of extensions by default, but I’ve added a few on top, and this blog post details what they are and how to get them, in no particular order…

First off, I want to wish everyone a Happy Holidays and a Merry Christmas. I know 2020 has been a hard year for so many, and I hope you and your families are healthy and making it through the year.

Over the past few years, I’ve gotten into making holiday ornaments for friends and family. In 2017, I did a snowflake PCB ornament. In 2018, I used laser cutting service Ponoko to cut acrylic fir trees with interlocking pieces. In 2019, I used my new 3D printer to print 3-dimensional snowflakes. In 2020, I’ve returned to my roots and gone with another PCB design. As a huge fan of DEFCON #badgelife, it felt appropriate to go back this way. I ended up with a touch-sensitive snowman with 6 LEDs.

Front of Ornament

The ornament features a snowman created by the use of the black silkscreen and white soldermask. The front artwork was created by drawing it in Inkscape, then exporting to a PNG, and pulling into KiCad’s bmp2component. Of course, bmp2component wants to put this as a footprint, so I had to adjust the resulting kicad_mod file to put things on the silkscreen layer.

There are 6 LEDs. The eyes and buttons are white LEDs and the nose, befitting the typical carrot, is an orange LED. ...

I was lucky to support GitOps Days 2020 EMEA last week. The community of GitOps practitioniers came together again for round two and we saw lots of very engaged discussion and new ideas. It was a great pleasure to play at the event and bring some playfulness and silliness to the breaks in between. As last time I found it a bit hard to read the crowd (you can’t see anyone), so I tried to pick from a variety of styles of danceable music.

LXD gives you system containers and virtual machines, usable from the same user interface. You would rather use system containers as they are more lightweight than VMs.

Previously we have seen how to use the Kali LXD containers (includes how to use a USB network adapter). There is documentation on using graphics applications (X11) in the Kali LXD containers at the Kali website. In this post we see again how to use graphics applications (X11) in the Kali LXD containers. The aim is to simplify and make the instructions more robust.

The following assume that you have configured LXD on your system.

Overview of the Kali LXD containers

Let’s have a look at the available Kali images. Currently, there are only container images (no VM images), for the x86_64, armel, arm64, armhf and i386 architectures. They all follow Kali current which is very fresh. There are plain and cloud images. The latter support cloud-init and are more user-friendly. The cloud images create a non-root account for us (username is debian)

$ lxc image list images:kali
+---------------------------+-------------------------------------+
|           ALIAS           |             DESCRIPTION           ...

In the last few weeks I have been asked by many people what topics we have in the Community Council and what we are doing. After a month in the Council, I want to give a first insight into what happened in the early days and what has been on my mind. Of course, these are all subjective impressions and I am not speaking here from the perspective of the Community Council, but from my own perspective.

In the beginning, of course, we had to deal with organisational issues. These include ensuring that everyone is included in the Community Council’s communication channels. There are two main channels that we use. On the one hand, we have a team channel on IRC on Freenode to exchange ideas. The channel has the advantage that you can ask the others small questions and have a relaxed chat. To reach everyone in the Council, we have set up the mailing list: community-council at lists.ubuntu.com

No, I haven’t yet managed to read through all the documents and threads that deal with the Community Council or how to make the community more active again. But I have already read a lot in the first month on the Community Hub and on mailing lists to get different impressions. I can only...

On a couple Telegram channels I have been radio silent for a couple days. I've gone silent elsewhere too. There has been a reason for this.

The health departments of Ashtabula County issued a stay at home advisory on Friday late in the day. Residents are advised to stay home as much as possible. There is also a statewide curfew in effect running from 10 PM to 5 AM each day.

This has required some hurried changes in operational circumstances. Twelve counties in Ohio have issued advisories and they general expire in mid-December. While compliance is notionally voluntary there is discussion of switching to enforced orders if this does not work out.

I now have to get a sermon written as well as a service planned so that "stay at home" services can be filmed. Considering that I am having to make hand-me-down analog tech do what I want this is not simple. That I am working out of my garage also compounds the level of difficulty.

Writing continues although I am definitely not meeting the NaNoWriMo usual daily word count goals. My target is to have a new novelette to go up on Kindle Direct Publishing at the start of December. Eventually I will get a Minimum Working Example posted as to...

Human perception has never ceased to amaze me, and in the context of this article, it is the perception of value, and the value of contribution that I want us to think about.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

It is yours in title, deed and asset

A common miss perception with Open Source software is the notion of free. Many people associate free in its simplest form, that of no monetary cost, and unfortunately this ultimately leads to the second conclusion of ‘cheap’ and low quality. Proprietary commercial vendors, and their corporate marketing departments know this and use that knowledge to focus their audience on ‘perceived value’. In some ways free of cost in the open source software world is a significant disadvantage, because it means there are no funds available to pay for a marketing machine to generate ‘perceived value’.

Think, for a moment, how much of a disadvantage that is when trying to develop a customer/user base.

Kubuntu is completely and whole contributon driven. It is forged from passion and enthusiasm, built with joy and above all love. Throughout our community; users use it because they love it, supporters help users, and each other,...

Automatic and continuous testing is a fundamental part of today’s development cycle. Given a Gitlab pipeline that runs for each commit, we should enforce not only all tests are passing, but also that a sufficient number of them are present.

cover

Photo by Pankaj Patel on Unsplash

Aren’t you convinced yet? Read 4 Benefits of CI/CD! If you don’t have a proper Gitlab pipeline to lint your code, run your test, and manage all that other annoying small tasks, you should definitely create one! I’ve written an introductory guide to Gitlab CI, and many more are available on the documentation website.

While there isn’t (unfortunately!) a magic wand to highlight if the code is covered by enough tests, and, in particular, if these tests are of a sufficient good quality, we can nonetheless find some valuable KPI we can act on. Today, we will check code coverage, what indicates, what does not, and how it can be helpful.

Code coverage

In computer science, test coverage is a measure used to describe the degree to which the source code of a program is executed when a particular test suite runs. A program with high test coverage, measured as a percentage, has had more of its source code...


KDE Will Support Fingerprints
https://www.debugpoint.com/2020/11/kde-plasma-5-21-fingerprint-manager/
https://www.theregister.com/2020/11/16/kde_maintainers_speak_on_why/
XFCE Shaping Up For a Strong Version 4.16
https://www.debugpoint.com/2020/11/xfce-4-16-release-highlights-2/
Microsoft Defender Previewing New Features for Linux Only
https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-defender-for-linux-adds-new-security-feature/#ftag=RSSbaffb68
Tuxedo Computers Reverse Engineers Drivers
https://9to5linux.com/tuxedo-computers-enables-full-linux-support-on-the-intel-tongfang-qc7-gaming-laptop
Tails 4.13 Out
https://tails.boum.org/news/version_4.13/

Kali 2020.4 Out
https://www.kali.org/news/kali-linux-2020-4-release/

IPFire 2.25 Core Update 152 Out
https://blog.ipfire.org/post/ipfire-2-25-core-update-152-released

Kaos 2020.11 Out
https://kaosx.us/news/2020/kaos11/

Ubuntu Web Remix Out
https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/ubuntu-web-remix/19394

Firefox 83 Out
https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/83.0/releasenotes/

Firefox 84 Soon to be out
https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/84.0beta/releasenotes/

Thunderbird 78.5.0 Out
https://www.thunderbird.net/en-US/thunderbird/78.5.0/releasenotes/

Wine 5.22 Out

OpenUK is looking for two charismatic and diligent individuals to be judges in the 2021 OpenUK Awards. After a successful first edition in 2020, OpenUK are looking to find two judges from the Community to judge the Awards with Katie Gamanji, our head Judge for 2021.

To be considered as an OpenUK judge:

  • You will be someone who knows at least one of the Open Source Software, Open Data or Open Hardware spaces well, enjoys engaging with the communities and wants to see good projects, people and organisations recognised, and
  • You will be willing to spend some time reviewing circa 100 applications and to make a fair assessment of the applications, be able to present your decision to your fellow judges and then to present during the Awards ceremony charismatically.

The Judges’ work requires a dive deep into the nominations and diligent investigation of all of the applications to come to a well informed and balanced decision.

Nomination form is open now if you’d like to help or you can think of someone who would be suitable.

This month just went past way too fast, didn’t get to all the stuff I wanted to, but managed to cover many essentials (not even listed here) that I’ll cover in follow-up posts. In particular, highlights that I’m thankful for are that we’ve selected the final artwork for Bullseye. We’ve also successfully hosted another two MiniDebConfs. One that was gaming themed, and a Brazilian event all in Portuguese! Videos are up on Debian’s PeerTube instance (Gaming Edition | Brazil) and on the DebConf video archive for direct download.

Remember to take care of yourself out there! Physical safety is high on everyone’s mind in these times, but remember to pay attention to your mental health too. It’s ok if you won’t hit all your usual targets and goals in these times, don’t be too hard on yourself and burn out!

2020-11-01: Upload package gtetrinet (0.7.11+git20200916.46e7ade-2~bpo10+1) to Debian buster-backports.

2020-11-01: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-disconnect-wifi (26-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-11-02: Merge MR!2, MR!4 and MR!5 for zram-tools, follow 3-way merge closing MR!1 and MR!3.

2020-11-02: Upload package zram-swap (0.3.3-1) to Debian unstable (Closes:

The KDE release service will make another bundle of releases next month on Dec 10th. If you have an app in KDE released as part of this please add in new feature on this wiki page so we can make an announcement

https://invent.kde.org/websites/kde-org/-/wikis/20.12-Releases

Welcome to the 2020 edition of my Hacker Holiday Gift Guide! This has been a trying year for all of us, but I sincerely hope you and your family are happy and healthy as this year comes to an end.

Table of Contents

  • General Security
    • ProtonMail Subscription
    • Encrypted Flash Drive
    • Cryptographic Security Key
    • Linux Basics for Hackers
  • Penetration Testers & Red Teamers
    • The Pentester Blueprint
    • Online Learning Labs
    • Penetration Testing: A Hands-On Introduction to Hacking
    • WiFi Pineapple Mark VII
    • PoC || GTFO
  • Hardware Hackers
    • Tigard
    • Hardware Hacker: Adventures in Making and Breaking Hardware
    • RTL-SDR Starter Kit
    • iFixit Pro Tech Toolkit
  • Young Hackers
    • imagiCharm
    • Mechanical Puzzles
  • Friends and Family of Hackers
    • Hardware Security Keys
    • Control-Alt-Hack
    • VPN Subscription
  • Non-Security Tech
    • Raspberry Pi 4
    • Keysy
    • Home Automation Learning Kit
    • Boogie Board Writing Tablet
  • General Offers
    • No Starch Press
    • Hooligan Keys

General Security

ProtonMail Subscription

ProtonMail is a great encrypted mail provider for those with an interest...


Linux Coming to Apple M1 Macs
https://www.patreon.com/marcan
New Ubuntu Members
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-news-team/2020-December/002944.html
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/kernel-team/2020-December/115268.html
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-news-team/2020-December/002946.html
Manjaro 20.2 Nibia Out
https://manjaro.org/news/

BlackArch 2020.12.1 Out
https://blackarch.org/blog.html

Nitrux 1.3.5 Out
https://blackarch.org/blog.html

KDE Plasma 5.20.4 Out
https://kde.org/announcements/plasma-5.20.3-5.20.4-changelog/

Cinnamon 4.8 Out
https://9to5linux.com/cinnamon-4-8-desktop-environment-released-new-features

OpenZFS 2.0 Out
https://github.com/openzfs/zfs/releases/tag/zfs-2.0.0

Linux Kernel 5.10 rc6 Out
https://www.lkml.org/lkml/2020/11/29/239

System76 Pangolin Announced
https://system76.com/laptops/pangolin

Credits:
Full Circle Magazine
@fullcirclemag
Host: @leochavez
BumperCanonical
Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust
https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Tornamos histórias enfadonhas em aventuras fantásticas, acontecimentos cinzentos em verdadeiros contos de fadas, ou então falamos só sobre Ubuntu e outras cenas… Aqui fica mais um episódio no vosso podcast preferido.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mduyk66lvb0
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/hacking-101-no-starch-press-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.pcguia.pt/linux-2/
  • https://devices.ubuntu-touch.io/installer/
  • https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tech_talks/utilizing-security-features-in-ssh
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop/product/nk-pro-2-nitrokey-pro-2-3?aff_ref=3
  • https://shop.nitrokey.com/de_DE/shop?aff_ref=3

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link...

This week we’ve been playing with OpenMW and Raspberry Pi 400. We discuss cloud gaming, bring you some GUI love and respond to all your feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 38 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Mark has been playing OpenMW
    • Alan has been playing with Raspberry Pi 400.
  • We discuss cloud gaming.
  • We share a GUI Lurve:
    • uLauncher – Application launcher for Linux
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
    • https://opensourcetechtrn.blogspot.com/2020/11/bash-bourne-again-shell.html
    • Tex Shinobi Keyboard
  • Image credit: Lina Trochez
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

  • Join us in the Ubuntu Podcast Telegram...

It’s the end of CentOS as we know it

Earlier this week, the CentOS project announced the shift to CentOS stream. In a nutshell, this means that they will discontinue being a close clone of RHEL along with security updates, and instead it will serve as a development branch of RHEL.

As you can probably imagine (or gleam from the comments in that post I referenced), a lot of people are unhappy about this.

One particular quote got my attention this morning while catching up on this week’s edition of Linux Weekly News, under the distributions quotes section:

I have been doing this for 17 years and CentOS is basically my life’s work. This was (for me personally) a heart wrenching decision. However, i see no other decision as a possibility. If there was, it would have been made.

Johnny Hughes

I feel really sorry for this person and can empathize, I’ve been in similar situations in my life before where I’ve poured all my love and energy into something and then due to some corporate or organisational decisions (and usually poor ones), the project got discontinued and all that work that went into it vanishes into the ether. Also, 17 years is really long to be contributing...

During last days I tried to get my Applied Micro Mustang running again. And it looks like it is no more. Like that Norwegian Blue parrot.

Tried some things

By default Mustang outputs information on serial console. It does not here. Checked serial cables, serial to usb dongles. Nothing.

Tried to load firmware from SD card instead of on-board flash. Nope.

Time to put it to rest.

How it looked

When I got it in June 2014 it came in 1U server case. With several loud fans. Including one on cpu radiator. So I took the board out and put into PC Tower case. Also replaced 50mm processor fan with 80mm one:

Top view of Mustang Top view of Mustang
Side view Side view

All that development…

I did several things on it:

  • tested USB support
  • tested PCI Express support
  • run X11 on hardware
  • debugged why X11 does not start out of the box
  • wrote new instruction how to unbrick it
  • run 64 and 32-bit virtual machines
  • used it as a desktop (day 1, day 2, last day)
  • tested OpenStack

Some of them were done for first time on AArch64.

Board gave me lot of fun. I built countless software packages on it. For CentOS, Debian, Fedora, RHEL. Tested installers of each of them.

Was running OpenStack on it since ‘liberty’ (especially after moving...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 660 for the week of November 29 – December 5, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Announcing the results of the Ubuntu Membership Board elections
  • Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations
  • Welcome New Members and Developers
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • USN-4661-1: Snapcraft vulnerability
  • FOSDEM Community Devroom 2021 CFP
  • Ubuntu Cloud News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 20.04, and 20.10
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

FOSDEM 2021 (Online) – Community DevRoom Call for Participation!

The twenty-first edition of FOSDEM will take place 6-7 February, 2021 – online, and we’re happy to announce that there will be a virtual Community DevRoom as part of the event. 

Key dates / New updates

  • Conference dates 6-7 February, 2021 (online)
  • Community DevRoom date: Sunday, 7 February, 2021 (online) 
  • Submission deadline: 22 December, 2020
  • Announcement of selected talks: 31 December, 2020
  • Submission of recorded talks: 17 January, 2021
  • Talks will be pre-recorded in advance, and streamed during the event
  • Q/A session will be taken live
  • A facility will be provided for people watching to chat between themselves
  • A facility will be provided for people watching to submit questions
  • The reference time will be Brussels local time (CET)
  • Talk submissions should be 30/40 mins – please specify the duration in your submission

IN MORE DETAIL 

The Community DevRoom will be back at FOSDEM 2021 (Online). Our goals in running this DevRoom are to:

  • Educate those who are primarily software developers on community-oriented topics that are vital in the process of software development, e.g. effective collaboration
  • Provide concrete...

This week we’ve been playing Cyberpunk 2077 and applying for Ubuntu Membership. We round up the goings on in the Ubuntu community and also bring you our favourite news picks from the wider tech world.

It’s Season 13 Episode 39 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been playing Cyberpunk 2077.
    • Mark has been writing an Ubuntu Membership application.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • NVIDIA 460.27.04 beta driver for Linux includes ray-tracing
    • ZaReason, the Linux PC Seller, Forced to Close
    • Snaps: How we got here
    • Pre-built Ubuntu machines for the little data scientists in your life
    • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS moving to Extended Security Maintenance
    • Raspberry Pi and Ubuntu: 2020 roundup
    • Call for Testing: Steam in Hirsute Hippo
  • We discuss the news:
    • BitCoin is on the verge of an explosive movement
    • CloudReady is now part of Google
    • CentOS “Refocuses”
  • Image credit: Frank Busch
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a...

Considering migrating to Ubuntu from other Linux platforms, such as CentOS?

Think Ubuntu- the most popular Linux distribution on public clouds, data centre and the edge. Since its inception, Ubuntu consistently gains market share, as of today reaching almost 50%.

Wondering why Ubuntu is so popular?

Here is our take:

Fact 1. Developers prefer Ubuntu

According to the 2020 HackerEarth Developer Survey, 66% of experienced developers and 69% of students prefer Ubuntu over other Linux distributions. This is because Ubuntu provides them with the greatest amount of latest open source software to work with. 

For example, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS comes with over 30,000 open source packages such as Python, Ruby, Go, Java, Apache, Nginx, PostgreSQL, MySQL, Node.js, PHP and more. This is why Ubuntu is by far the most popular Linux distribution, followed by a distant no.2 –  CentOS chosen by 11% of working professionals.

Fact 2. Ubuntu LTS is predictable, stable and secure

A long term support (LTS) version of Ubuntu is released every two years, and all LTS releases benefit from five years of free security maintenance (which can be extended to ten years). To keep Ubuntu users secure, the Ubuntu...

In the previous post I went over the reasons for switching to my own hardware and what hardware I ended up selecting for the job.

Now it’s time to look at how I intend to achieve the high availability goals of this setup. Effectively limiting the number of single point of failure as much as possible.

Hardware redundancy

On the hardware front, every server has:

  • Two power supplies
  • Hot swappable storage
  • 6 network ports served by 3 separate cards
  • BMC (IPMI/redfish) for remote monitoring and control

The switch is the only real single point of failure on the hardware side of things. But it also has two power supplies and hot swappable fans. If this ever becomes a problem, I can also source a second unit and use data and power stacking along with MLAG to get rid of this single point of failure.

I mentioned that each server has four 10Gbit ports yet my switch is Gigabit. This is fine as I’ll be using a mesh type configuration for the high-throughput part of the setup. Effectively connecting each server to the other two with a dual 10Gbit bond each. Then each server will get a dual Gigabit bond to the switch for external connectivity.

Software redundancy

The software...

The Linux Foundation

Decentralized innovation, built on trust.

Linuxtechi

Linux Today