What is an operating system?

An operating system (OS) is the Application Which, after being initially loaded into the computer by a boot program, oversees all the other application programs in a computer. The application programs make use of the working system by making Furthermore, users can interact directly with the operating system Via a user interface like a command line or a graphical user interface (GUI).

9 Popular Mobile Operating Systems

Android OS (Google Inc.) ...
2. Bada (Samsung Electronics) ...
BlackBerry OS (Research In Motion) ...
iPhone OS / iOS (Apple) ...
MeeGo OS (Nokia and Intel) ...
Palm OS (Garnet OS) ...
Symbian OS (Nokia) ...
webOS (Palm/HP) ...

Types of operating systems.

Operating systems normally include pre-loaded on almost any Computer you purchase. Many men and women use the operating system which comes with their computer, however it is possible to update or perhaps alter operating systems. The three most frequent operating systems for personal computers are Microsoft Windows, macOS, and Linux. A GUI enables you to use your mouse to click on icons, switches , and menus, and that which is clearly displayed on the display by means of a combo of images and text. Each operating system's GUI includes a different feel and look, so if you Switch to another operating system it might appear unfamiliar at first. However, modern operating systems have been made to be effortless to utilize , and the majority of the fundamental principles are exactly the same.

Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
macOS
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
Linux
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.
Operating systems for mobile devices
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.

kde.org/applications now has latest release versions and dates on it.  Finally you can check your app store or distro is up to date 🙂

This was added to the website by elite new contributor David Barchiesi and there’s been a year of faff in the background getting it added to the release process in various places, but if apps are missing it then talk to the app maintainers to get it added.

Our All About the Apps Goal has plenty more tasks to be done if you want to help out, some website related, many packaging related to get apps into more Stores and some about making docs and videos etc to help encourage getting more KDE apps to more people.

 

Jonathan Riddell will be talking about KDE’s “All About the Apps” goal this Friday at OpenUK’s Future Leader’s Training. Register by mailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

https://openuk.uk/event-calendar/kde-operating-systems-and-apps/

Quick and dirty

  • Install python3-virtualenvwrapper (via pip or via package manager)
  • Export a workon directory: export WORKON_HOME=/home/foursixnine/Projects/python-virtualenv
  • source virtualenvwrapper
foursixnine@deimos:~/Projects> source virtualenvwrapper    
virtualenvwrapper.user_scripts creating /home/foursixnine/Projects/python-virtualenv/premkproject
...
virtualenvwrapper.user_scripts creating /home/foursixnine/Projects/python-virtualenv/get_env_details
  • mkvirtualenv newenv
foursixnine@deimos:~/Projects> mkvirtualenv newenv
created virtual environment CPython3.8.3.final.0-64 in 115ms
  creator CPython3Posix(dest=/home/foursixnine/Projects/python-virtualenv/newenv, clear=False, global=False)
  seeder FromAppData(download=False, pip=latest, setuptools=latest, wheel=latest, via=copy, app_data_dir=/home/foursixnine/.local/share/virtualenv/seed-app-data/v1.0.1)
  activators BashActivator,CShellActivator,FishActivator,PowerShellActivator,PythonActivator,XonshActivator
virtualenvwrapper.user_scripts creating /home/foursixnine/Projects/python-virtualenv/newenv/bin/predeactivate
...
virtualenvwrapper.user_scripts creating...


Paragon Software Unhappy about exFAT in Kernel 5.7
https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/03/the-exfat-filesystem-is-coming-to-linux-paragon-softwares-not-happy-about-it/
Debian Announces Biohackathon
https://lists.debian.org/debian-devel-announce/2020/03/msg00010.html
Linux Mint 20 will be named Ulyana
https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3887
GNU Guix Plans Addition of Hurd Micro-Kernel
https://guix.gnu.org/blog/2020/a-hello-world-virtual-machine-running-the-hurd/
Huawei Signs Non-Agression Patent Pact with Open Invention Network
https://www.theregister.com/2020/04/02/huawei_open_invention_network/
Ubuntu 20.04 Beta Out
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-announce/2020-April/000255.html

RHEL 7.8 Out
https://www.redhat.com/archives/rhelv6-list/2020-March/msg00000.html

OpenMediaVault 5.0 Out

https://www.openmediavault.org/?p=2685
Gnome 3.36.1 Out
https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gnome-announce-list/2020-April/msg00001.html

Pinephone with UBPorts Out
https://www.pine64.org/2020/04/02/pinephone-ubports-community-edition-pre-orders-now-open/

OpenEuler 20.03 Out
https://www.huawei.com/en/press-events/news/2020/3/openeuler-lts-open-source-operating-system

Wireguard 1.0.0 Out

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 635 for the week of June 7 – 13, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys for system administrators
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys partition layout
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Other Articles of Interest
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 19.10, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

I work with OpenDev CI for a while. My first Kolla patches were over three years ago. We (Linaro) added AArch64 nodes few times — some nodes were taken down, some replaced, some added.

Speed or lack of it

Whenever you want to install some Python package using pip it is downloaded from Pypi (directly or mirror). If there is a binary package then you get it, if not then “noarch” package is fetched.

In worst case source tarball is downloaded and whole build process starts. You need to have all required compilers installed, development headers for Python and all required libraries and rest of needed tools. And then wait. And wait as some packages require a lot of time.

And then repeat it again and again as you are not allowed to upload packages into Pypi for projects you do not own.

Argh you, protobuf

There was a new release of protobuf package. OpenStack bot picked it up, sent patch for review and it got merged.

And all AArch64 CI jobs failed…

Turned out that protobuf 3.12.0 was released with x86 wheels only. No source tarball. At all.

This turned out to be new maintainer mistake — after 2-3 weeks it was fixed in 3.12.2 release.

Another CI job then

So I started looking at...

SBBR or GTFO

Me.

But Arm world no longer ends on “SBBR compliant or complete mess”. For over a year there is new specification called EBBR (Embedded Base Boot Requirements).

WTH is EBBR?

In short it is kind of SBBR for devices which can not comply. So you still need to have some subset of UEFI Boot/Runtime Services but it can be provided by whatever bootloader you use. So U-Boot is fine as long it’s EFI implementation is enabled.

ACPI is not required but may be present. DeviceTree is perfectly fine. You may provide both or one of them.

Firmware can be stored wherever you wish. Even MBR partitioning is available if really needed.

Make it nice way

RockPro64 has 16MB of SPI flash on board. This is far more than needed for storing firmware (I remember time when it was enough for palmtop Linux).

During last month I sent a bunch of patches to U-Boot to make this board as comfortable to use as possible. Including storing of all firmware parts into on board SPI flash.

To have U-Boot there you need to fetch two files:

  • SPL + TPL
  • U-Boot itself

Their sha256 sums:

3985f2ec63c2d31dc14a08bd19ed2766b9421f6c04294265d484413c33c6dccc ...

ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys dataset layout

After looking at the global partition layout when you select the ZFS option on ubuntu 20.04 LTS, let’s dive in details what are exactly inside those ZFS pools, I name bpool and rpool!

We are mainly focusing on two kinds of ZFS datasets: filesytem datasets and snapshot datasets. We already eluded to them multiple times in previous blog posts, but if you want to follow this section, I highly recommend following this couple of ZFS tutorials (setup and basics and snapshot and clones) or watching this introduction. This will help guiding you on those concepts.

Current states and its datasets

If you run zsysctl show --full, you will see exactly the datasets that our current state is made of:

$ zsysctl show --full
Name:               rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_e2wti1
ZSys:               true
Last Used:          current
Last Booted Kernel: vmlinuz-5.4.0-29-generic
System Datasets:
 - bpool/BOOT/ubuntu_e2wti1
 - rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_e2wti1
 - rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_e2wti1/srv
 - rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_e2wti1/usr
 - rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_e2wti1/var
 - rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_e2wti1/usr/local
 - rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_e2wti1/var/games
 -...

Há novidades das entregas do PinePhone, desenvolvimentos nos pacotes para Cartão de Cidadão, novamente os descontos estrondosos nas Librebrend Librebox, dramas à volta do snap do chromium, quota de mercado do GNU/Linux e do Ubuntu e sua potêncial relação com o trabalho remoto.

Vejam lá que ainda tivemos tempo para para do UBports da OTA-12, da OTA-13, de PinePhone e Volla Phone

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://joinpeertube.org/roadmap
  • https://libretrend.com/specs/librebox

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por...

This week we’ve become Sudoku masters and made Ubuntu MATE images for the Raspberry Pi. We discuss Pine64 announcing the PineTab, plus launching a new OS for PinePhone, the Ubuntu Appliance Portfolio announcement, what Ubuntu Certified device are, more GNOME performance improvements, and 20.04.1 being delayed. We also round up our picks from the tech news.

It’s Season 13 Episode 13 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Stuart Langridge are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been making images of Ubuntu MATE 20.04 LTS for the Raspberry Pi.
    • Stuart has been watching Cracking the Cryptic.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • Pine64 announces the PineTab
    • Pine64 also launches new PinePhone community edition with PostmarketOS
    • Canonical has launched the Ubuntu Appliance Portfolio
    • People and processes behind “Ubuntu certified” devices
    • New Patches Aim To Improve Smoothness & Latency Of NVIDIA On GNOME
    • Ubuntu LTS point releases are delayed
  • We mention some events:
    • GNOME Community Challenge
    • “Our goal is to encourage individuals or teams to submit stimulating ideas that will connect the next...

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS has switched to using the IBus input framework for most (all?) languages, even those based on the Latin, Cyrillic or Greek scripts. Typing in English is not that demanding for your operating system; there is a one to one association between the key you press, and the result you see on your screen. But if you have to type accents, or type in some more complex script, then you need a more advanced input framework.

You wouldn’t notice a difference when typing on Ubuntu 20.04, unless your language has accents and when you type, you press special key combinations to add those accents. For example, «αηδόνι». Notice the accent on the «ο». When you type the accent and then the «ο», you get visual information on the imminent composition of «ό».

Typing in Greek on Ubuntu 20.04. Input is handled by IBus, and by default we can see visually the addition of the accents while typing.

But is it worth the effort to switch to something more complex when the old way used to work just fine? That’s a perennial question. My view is that once you switch to an input framework, you can do much more advanced and exciting things. This post is about using the ibus-typing-booster...

First, I strongly recommend switching to Jitsi Meet:

  • It's free
  • It doesn't require you to sign up at all
  • It's open source
  • It's on the cutting edge of privacy and security features

Second, Anything else that runs in a browser instead of trying to get you to download an specific desktop application. Your browser protects you from many stupid things a company may try to do. Installing their app means you are at more risk. (Apps for phones is a different story.).

A small sampling of other web based options:

  • Talky.io (also open source, no account required)
  • 8x8.vc which is the company that sponsors Jitsi Meet. Their offering has more business options
  • Whatever Google calls their video chat product this week (Duo, Hangouts, Meet).
  • join.me
  • Microsoft Skype (no signups or account required for a basic meeting!)
  • whereby

There are many reasons not to choose Zoom.

😞😞😞

Finally, So you have to use Zoom?

Zoom actually supports joining a call with a web browser. They just don't promote it. Some things may not work as well but you get to keep more of your privacy and security.

  1. On joining the meeting close the request to run a local app.
  2. Click Launch Meeting in middle of screen. Zoom join meeting page
  3. Again close...

Time for a 20.04 LTS LiveCD memory comparison with a bunch more distros. I last did one in 2016.

Using Lubuntu as an example base memory usage approximately doubled from 2016 (251M) to 2020 (585M). Those numbers aren't strictly comparable because I'm not using the exact same setup as in 16.04 and I enabled more modern features (virtio graphics, EUFI, 4 cores).

>>Memory usage compared (in G)000.20.20.40.40.60.60.80.8111.21.21.41.41.61.61.81.8222.22.2Clear 33300Elementary 5.1Endless 3.8Fedora 32KubuntuLubuntuManjaro 20.0.3 XFCEopenSUSE Leap 15.1Solus 4.1UbuntuUbuntu BudgieUbuntu MateXubuntu0.822.259000436946966356.3326446313486Clear 333000.869.95685851611904356.3326446313486Elementary 5.11117.6547165952911337.5288111415677Endless 3.81.25165.35257467446323314.02401927934153Fedora 320.8213.05043275363525356.3326446313486Kubuntu0.585260.7482908328073376.54676563286307Lubuntu0.9308.44614891197944346.93072788645816Manjaro 20.0.3 XFCE1.25356.14400699115146314.02401927934153openSUSE Leap 15.11403.84186507032354337.5288111415677Solus 4.11451.53972314949556337.5288111415677Ubuntu1499.2375812286677337.5288111415677Ubuntu Budgie0.9546.9354393078397346.93072788645816Ubuntu Mate

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 636 for the week of June 14 – 20, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Point Release Delays
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • New subiquity release coming
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys dataset layout
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys properties on ZFS datasets
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • In Other News
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 19.10, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

Uma inédita performance artística, o drama dos snaps no Mint, as aventuras com self-hosting de Jitsi Meet, o cantinho da Impressão 3D, colaboração com Markdown, um primeiro olhar para o Pine64 PinePhone UBports Community Edition, a pré-venda dos PineTab com Ubuntu Touch. Ainda passámos pelas próximas actividades da comunidade Ubuntu-PT, traduções de Software Livre, LXD e containers com reverse Proxy, e pelas notícias do UBports e do seu ecossistema incluindo clickable e Halium e os avanços que se avizinham para o VollaPhone.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://libretrend.com/specs/librebox

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a...

User namespaces were designed from the start to meet a requirement that unprivileged users be able to make use of them. Eric accomplished this by introducing subuid and subgid delegations through shadow. These are defined by the /etc/subuid and /etc/subgid files, which only root can write to. The setuid-root programs newuidmap and newgidmap, which ship with shadow, respect the subids delegated in those two files.

Until recently, programs which wanted to query available mappings, like lxc-usernsexec, have each parsed these two files. Now, shadow ships a new library, libsubid, to facilitate more programatic querying of subids. The API looks like this:

struct subordinate_range **get_subuid_ranges(const char *owner);
struct subordinate_range **get_subgid_ranges(const char *owner);
void subid_free_ranges(struct subordinate_range **ranges);

int get_subuid_owners(uid_t uid, uid_t **owner);
int get_subgid_owners(gid_t gid, uid_t **owner);

/* range should be pre-allocated with owner and count filled in, start is
 * ignored, can be 0 */
bool grant_subuid_range(struct subordinate_range *range, bool reuse);
bool grant_subgid_range(struct subordinate_range *range, bool reuse);

bool...

ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys properties on ZFS datasets

We are almost done in our long journey presenting our ZFS work on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. The last piece to highlight is how we annotate datasets with some user properties to store metadata needed on boot and on state revert. As we stated on our ZSys presentation article, one of the main principles is to avoid using a dedicated database which can quickly go out of sync with the real system: we store - and thus, rely - only on ZFS properties that are set on the datasets themselves. Taking your pool and moving it to another machine is sufficient.

This will probably give you the necessary information (alongside with the post on partition and dataset layouts) if you want to turn your existing ZFS system to one compatible with ZSys.

Without further ado, it’s time to directly check all that on details!

ZFS properties

Of course, ZFS datasets properties are the main source of information when we build up a representation of the system when starting ZSys. We are using in particular canmount and mountpoint ZFS properties. While the usage of mountpoint is unequivocal, canmount has 3 meaningful states for us:

  • off: we ignore the...

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that the Crypto Wars are back. Politicians, seemingly led by Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, seem bound and determined to undermine user’s privacy and security online to strengthen the power of the police state. It will have disproportionate affects on the innocent rather than criminals and will raise operating costs and make it much harder for small businesses and startups to compete in the US.

  1. Much like guns and nuclear weapons, the cryptography genie is already out of the bottle. Inserting backdoors or limiting access to encryption will affect law-abiding citizens, but criminals will be able to continue to use encryption software that already exists. In fact, the Al Qaeda terrorist organization already develops their own encryption software. It’s not like they’ll comply with US laws. While we might succeed in reducing their access to some types of encryption (e.g., encrypted phones), we won’t be able to completely eliminate it for motivated criminal enterprises or terror cells.
  2. There are a lot of legitimate reasons to want to use end-to-end encryption or full device encryption. Do companies want their...

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In May, 198 work hours have been dispatched among 14 paid contributors. Their reports are available:
  • Abhijith PA did 18.0h (out of 14h assigned and 4h from April).
  • Anton Gladky gave back the assigned 10h and declared himself inactive.
  • Ben Hutchings did 19.75h (out of 17.25h assigned and 2.5h from April).
  • Brian May did 10h (out of 10h assigned).
  • Chris Lamb did 17.25h (out of 17.25h assigned).
  • Dylan Aïssi gave back the assigned 6h and declared himself inactive.
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did not manage to work LTS in May and now reported 5h work in April (out of 17.25h assigned plus 46h from April), thus is carrying over 58.25h for June.
  • Markus Koschany did 25.0h (out of 17.25h assigned and 56h from April), thus carrying over 48.25h to June.
  • Mike Gabriel did 14.50h (out of 8h assigned and 6.5h from April).
  • Ola Lundqvist did 11.5h (out of 12h assigned and 7h from April), thus carrying over 7.5h to June.
  • Roberto C. Sánchez did 17.25h (out of 17.25h assigned).
  • Sylvain Beucler did 17.25h (out of 17.25h assigned).
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 17.25h (out of...

This week we’ve been playing Command & Conquer. We discuss your recent feedback about snaps and Ubuntu rolling release. Then we bring you some command line love and go over the rest of your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 14 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Stuart Langridge are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Mark has been playing Command and Conquer.
  • We discuss all your feedback about snaps and rolling releases.
  • We share a Command Line Lurve:
    • proselint – Linter for prose
sudo apt install python3-proselint
proselint text.md
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
    • Draw on your Screen GNOME extension
    • The Ballad of Lidl & Aldi by Mick MacConnell at John B. Keane’s Bar in Listowel
  • Image credit: Esteban Lopez
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to

Broadly speaking, most snaps in the Snap Store fall into one of two categories, desktop applications and server daemons. The graphical applications such as Chromium and Spotify use desktop files, which ensure they can be opened on demand by any user via a menu or launcher. The server applications such as NextCloud and AdGuard-Home typically have systemd units, which control their automatic (background) startup.

Taking an existing desktop application and converting it to an always-running appliance leads to some interesting engineering challenges. Applications and games tend to have expectations for what programs and services are accessible at runtime, which need mitigating. Application confinement in snaps on Ubuntu Core means some assumptions about file and device access may no longer apply.  

We will typically need to stand-up a configuration in which the application believes it’s running in a standard desktop environment. The application will also need the startup automated in an appliance setting, but launched on demand when in a desktop environment.

We can be quite creative with snaps and build a “split personality” snap that can run both as a desktop application...

A growing number of car companies have made their autonomous vehicle (AV) datasets public in recent years. 

Daimler fueled the trend by making its Cityscapes dataset freely available in 2016. Baidu and Aptiv respectively shared the ApolloScapes and nuScenes datasets in 2018. Lyft, Waymo and Argo followed suit in 2019. And more recently, automotive juggernauts Ford and Audi released datasets from their AV research programs to the public.

Given the potential of self-driving cars to considerably disrupt transportation as we know it, it is worth taking a moment to explore what has motivated these automotive players — otherwise fiercely protective of their intellectual property — to openly share their precious AV datasets with each other and with the wider world.

The idea of AV datasets

AV prototypes come with a bunch of integrated sensors. Cameras, lidars, radars, sonars, GPS, IMUs, thermometers, hygrometers, you name it. Each of these sensors specialises in gathering one specific kind of information about the car’s environment.

Now imagine a fleet of such prototypes driven through different environments under varying traffic, weather and lighting conditions, all...

I have written prior that I wound up getting a new laptop. Due to the terms of getting the laptop I ended up paying not just for a license for Windows 10 Professional but also for Microsoft Office. As you might imagine I am not about to burn that much money at the moment. With the advent of the Windows Subsystem for Linux I am trying to work through using it to handle my Linux needs at the moment.

Besides, I did not realize OpenSSH was available as an optional feature for Windows 10 as well. That makes handling the herd of Raspberry Pi boards a bit easier. Having the WSL2 window open doing one thing and a PowerShell window open running OpenSSH makes life simple. PowerShell running OpenSSH is a bit easier to use compared to PuTTY so far.

The Ubuntu Wiki mentions that you can run graphical applications using Windows Subsystem for Linux. The directions appear to work for most people. On my laptop, though, they most certainly did not work.

After review the directions were based on discussion in a bug on Github where somebody came up with a clever regex. The problem is that kludge only works if your machine acts as its own nameserver. When I followed the instructions as written my...

A friend recently asked me if I could recommend some reading about hacking and security culture. I gave a couple of quick answers, but it inspired me to write a blog post in case anyone else is looking for similar content. Unless otherwise noted, I’ve read all of these books/resources and can recommend them.

Nonfiction

Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World

Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World is a well-researched deep dive into one of the original and most significant hacking groups. Members of the cDc have been involved in many of the early fundamental techniques and tools in the world of hacking. Even now, decades later, they continue to influence the fields of hacking and cybersecurity, through activities like member Beto O’Rourke’s influences in politics, major roles in the cybersecurity industry, and other positions. They’ve had members testify before Congress, involved in running DARPA, and the development of privacy technology Tor. There’s also a great companion talk to go with the book.

Breaking and Entering: The Extraordinary Story of a Hacker Called "Alien"

Breaking and Entering: The Extraordinary Story of a Hacker Called “Alien” covers a story of a hacker who started her foray into exploring the restricted during...

This month:
* Command & Conquer
* How-To : Python, LivePatch, and Rawtherapee
* Graphics : Inkscape
* Graphics : Krita for Old Photos
* Linux Loopback
* Everyday Ubuntu : Turbogfx 16
* Ubports Touch : OTA-12
* Review : Ubuntu, Lubuntu and Budgie 20.04
* Ubuntu Games : Eagle Island
plus: News, My Story, The Daily Waddle, Q&A, and more.

Get it while it’s hot: https://fullcirclemagazine.org/issue-157/

ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys for system administrators

Now that we covered the basics ZSys functionalities, I think you realize that the system is generally fully transparent to the users. However, most of system administrators are more likely to want to deep dive in more details on how you can tweak those behavior and observe more information on the current status. We getting more technical from now on and for the rest of the series covering ZSys & ZFS on ubuntu 20.04 LTS!

Client/Service architecture

As explained in the corresponding post, ZSys has a client/service architecture (mediated by polkit). The unix socket which activates on demand zsysd is using SO_PEERCRED to pass credentials (who/when) and with some (black magic) wizardry and multiple attempts, we were able to make it work over gRPC, the communication RPC framework we are using. As this whole combination was not really documented anywhere on the Internet, it may be useful to document that in a more technical blog post in the future. So if you are interested, let us know in the discourse link!

ZSys architecture

This is why we have a zsysctl service commands with a bunch of subcommands:

$ zsysctl help service
Service...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 634 for the week of May 31 – June 6, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Welcome New Members and Developers
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys commands for state management
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys state collection
  • OpenStack Ussuri for Ubuntu 20.04 and 18.04 LTS
  • Ubuntu Studio: Ardour 6.0 Information
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 19.10, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

I’m not outside.

Right now, a mass of people are in Centenary Square in Birmingham.

They’ll currently be chanting. Then there’s music and speeches and poetry and a lie-down. I’m not there. I wish I was there.

This is part of the Black Lives Matter protests going on around the world, because again a black man was murdered by police. His name was George Floyd. That was in Minneapolis; a couple of months ago Breonna Taylor, a black woman, was shot eight times by police in Louisville. Here in the UK black and minority ethnicity people die in police custody twice as much as others.

It’s 31 years to the day since the Tiananmen Square protests in China in which a man stood in front of a tank, and then he disappeared. Nobody even knows his name, or what happened to him.

The protests in Birmingham today won’t miss one individual voice, mine. And the world doesn’t need the opinion of one more white guy on what should be done about all this, about the world crashing down around our ears; better that I listen and support. I can’t go outside, because I’m immunocompromised. The government seems to flip-flop on whether it’s OK for shielding people to go out or not, but in a world where there...

The Ubuntu OpenStack team at Canonical is pleased to announce the general availability of OpenStack Ussuri on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive. Details of the Ussuri release can be found at:  https://www.openstack.org/software/ussuri

To get access to the Ubuntu Ussuri packages:

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

OpenStack Ussuri is available by default for installation on Ubuntu 20.04.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

The Ubuntu Cloud Archive pocket for OpenStack Ussuri can be enabled on Ubuntu 18.04 by running the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository cloud-archive:ussuri

The Ubuntu Cloud Archive for Ussuri includes updates for:

aodh, barbican, ceilometer, ceph octopus (15.2.1), cinder, designate, designate-dashboard, dpdk (19.11.1), glance, gnocchi, heat, heat-dashboard, horizon, ironic, keystone, libvirt (6.0.0), magnum, manila, manila-ui, mistral, murano, murano-dashboard, networking-arista, networking-bagpipe, networking-bgpvpn, networking-hyperv, networking-l2gw, networking-mlnx, networking-odl, networking-sfc, neutron, neutron-dynamic-routing, neutron-fwaas, neutron-fwaas-dashboard, neutron-vpnaas, nova, octavia, octavia-dashboard,...

This week we’ve been making podcasts and porting games to Scratch. We discuss Mint breaking Chromium, possible new features in Groovy Gorilla, GNOME defeating a patent troll, ZFS on Ubuntu, microk8s coming to Windows and macOS and Lenovo shipping Ubuntu or more laptops and workstations. We also round up some of our favourite stories from the tech world.

It’s Season 13 Episode 11 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Joe Ressington are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Joe has been making Late Night Linux, The New Show and 2.5 Admins podcasts.
    • Martin has been helping port Antsy Alien Attack! to Scratch.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • Mint breaks chromium in APT. See the Chromium in Ubuntu – deb to snap transition blog for more details.
    • OMG Ubuntu speculates on Groovy Gorilla features
    • Didier Roche has a series of blog posts about ZFS
    • microK8s is now available on Windows and MacOS
    • Lenovo Makes Entire Workstation Range Available with Ubuntu
  • We discuss the news:
    • GNOME gets big open-source patent win
    • Electronic Arts release CNC source code
    • 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 launched
  • Image credit: Nimish...

When working with customers on snaps and Ubuntu Core one of the most asked questions I get in calls and at events in booth discussions is about building your code in-house.

Many companies simply do not allow their sources to leave the house …yet many of these customers have also used https://build.snapcraft.io before for their test projects …

Typically I point such customers to use lxd and snapcraft manually, or to just go with multipass … but then the question comes up “how do I build for my ARM IoT device” ?

There is no easy way to cross-build snaps so it usually boils down to some complex setup that has some ARM device in the back end doing the actual building and requires some more or less complex work to get it up and running.

This gave me an idea … and I started to write a bunch of pylxd scripts that you could easily install as a snap to do a build in lxd… pretty much like https://build.snapcraft.io does, just without a UI … This was during the annual company shutdown at the end of last year (canonical shuts down for two weeks over christmas each year).

In February I tried to actually create a UI, using web sockets talking to the build script to show the output … but I...

Our friends at Ardour have released Version 6.0, and we would like to offer them a huge congratulations! While the source code and their own builds were available on release day, many of you have been waiting for Ardour 6.0 to come to Ubuntu’s repositories. Today, that day came. Ardour... Continue reading

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 633 for the week of May 24 – 30, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys general presentation
  • ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys general principle on state management
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 19.10, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

I would say that this was a crazy month, but with everything ever escalating, does that even mean anything anymore?

I lost track of tracking my activities in the second half of the month, and I’m still not very good at logging the “soft stuff”, that is, things like non-technical work but that also takes up a lot of time, but will continue to work on it.

Towards the end of the month I spent a huge amount of time on MiniDebConf Online, I’m glad it all worked out, and will write a seperate blog entry on that. Thank you again to everyone for making it a success!

I’m also moving DPL activities to the DPL blog, so even though it’s been a busy month in the free software world… my activity log here will look somewhat deceptively short this month…

MiniDebConf Online

2020-05-06: Help prepare initial CfP mail.

2020-05-06: Process some feedback regarding accessibility on Jitsi.

Debian Packaging

2020-05-02: Upload package gnome-shell-extension-workspaces-to-dock (53-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-05-02: Upload package tetzle (2.1.6-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-05-06: Upload package bundlewrap (3.9.0-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-05-06: Accept MR#1 for...

I must confess that since Ubuntu started, there have been a lot of changes that we have experienced on our desktop (each time for the better). However, I have always loved changing its appearance, to one more according to my particular tastes, sometimes up to 3 changes per year. This is one of the features that I like most about GNU / Linux, the freedom to adapt everything to my liking.

This time, I wanted to make some slight changes in search of elegant minimalism.

This is how I started testing a new icon pack and a tool that works as a widget and that animates my desktop, for this I used Conky.

The end result has been this.

In this sense, I describe in detail the steps taken to reach this result.

Installing Conky on Ubuntu 20.04.

sudo apt update
sudo apt install conky-all conky 

when it finally installed I proceeded to create a hidden file in my home directory called .conkyrc

vi ~/.conkyrc

Then I did insert this content in the file and then save and exit

conky.config = {
-------------------------------------
--  Generic...

While searching for your next GNU/Linux enabled computer, you may have found that some vendors such as Dell, HP and Lenovo sell a selection of desktops and laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed. In fact, Ubuntu is certified on an ever-growing list of hardware. But what does it mean exactly for such a device to be “Ubuntu certified”, and how does this happen? Let’s find out.

Laptops under test part of the Ubuntu certified processLaptops under testing running Ubuntu Linux

Certified for Ubuntu

A computer is made of many different components, from the CPU to the touchpad, the sound card to the wireless module. In order to provide the best user experience, each of these components has to work well on its own, and all of them have to play well together. If you’ve ever installed GNU/Linux on a recent computer or a device with very specific components, you know it’s rarely an easy task. After installing your favorite Linux distribution on your brand new laptop, you log in and discover that the Bluetooth doesn’t work so you cannot use your wireless mouse. Later on, you close your laptop lid, put it in your bag and when you reopen it, you find out the audio is not available anymore and you have to reboot to listen to your music!

The...

Sporting a beautiful 10.1” 1920x1200 display, the Lenovo IdeaPad Duet Chromebook or Duet Chromebook, is one of the latest Chromebooks released, and one of the few slate-style tablets, and it’s only about 300 EUR (300 USD). I’ve had one for about 2 weeks now, and here are my thoughts.

Build & Accessories

The tablet is a fairly Pixel-style affair, in that the back has two components, one softer blue one housing the camera and a metal feeling gray one. Build quality is fairly good.

The volume and power buttons are located on the right side of the tablet, and this is one of the main issues: You end up accidentally pressing the power button when you want to turn your volume lower, despite the power button having a different texture.

Alongside the tablet, you also find a kickstand with a textile back, and a keyboard, both of which attach via magnets (and pogo pins for the keyboard). The keyboard is crammed, with punctuation keys being halfed in size, and it feels mushed compared to my usual experiences of ThinkPads and Model Ms, but it’s on par with other Chromebooks, which is surprising, given it’s a tablet attachment.

fully assembled chromebook duet

fully assembled chromebook duet

I mostly use the Duet...

This week we’ve been shaving our face and finding new monitors in unexpected places. We discuss if Ubuntu should become a rolling release, bring you a GUI love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 12 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Joe Ressington are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has new male grooming products.
    • Mark has a new monitor.
  • We discuss if Ubuntu should be a rolling release.
  • We share a GUI Lurve:
    • antimicro – Map keyboard buttons and mouse controls to a gamepad to playing games with no gamepad support.
    • antimicrox – Continuation of antimicro.
sudo apt install antimicro
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
    • Design brief AntennaPod logo update
  • Image credit: Laura Schulze
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to

ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys partition layout

We have covered ZSys quite extensively over the past blog posts, from what’s new to its functionalities in details.

It’s now time to look at the other part of the system: what happens when you install your system? Which partition layout and why are we choosing this one? What ZFS datasets are created and how do we lay them out? We will answer to all those questions from this part of the blog post series. Let’s start right away with the partitioning method.

Partition layout

Once you click on this “Install on entire disk” button, we lay out and split your disk in multiple partitions. We don’t limit the ZSys supported layout to it (technically, you don’t even need a separated bpool partition even), however we try to setup some best practices to be as flexible and compatible as possible.

4 partitions to rule them all

After selecting entire disk, our default choice will always creates 4 partitions:

$ sudo gdisk -l /dev/nvme0n1
GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 1.0.5
[…]
Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size       Code  Name
   1            2048         1050623   512.0 MiB   EF00  EFI System Partition
   2         1050624     ...

Neste episódio falamos do encontro mensal da Comunidade e dos planos para o encontro de Junho, das nossas aventuras semanais, migração de infraestrutura com LXD, financiamento de Software Livre, doações da Slimbook para a comunidade, do crowdfunding do Ubuntu Podcast, adopção responsável de Thinkpads e dos super-descontos nas Libretrend Librebox.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://libretrend.com/specs/librebox

Apoios

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

A música do genérico é: “Won’t...

Neste episódio falamos do encontro mensal da Comunicade e dos planos para o encontro de Junho, das nossas aventuras semanais, migração de infraestrutura com LXD, financiamento de Software Livre, doações da Slimbook para a comunidade, do crowdfunding do Ubuntu Podcast, adopção responsável de Thinkpads e dos super-descontos nas Libretrend Librebox.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://libretrend.com/specs/librebox

Apoios

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

A música do genérico é: “Won’t...

The state of being productive comes in various guises. Sometimes, you want to do more. Sometimes, you want less. It’s been a while since we toured the Snap Store, and we thought you would be interested in a fresh batch of cool, fun and useful applications that can help you perfect your daily digital activities. Without further ado, let’s have a look.

Auto-cpufreq

Thanks to thermodynamics, power and performance are two opposing forces. Not a problem when you have unlimited power – wall plugs – but on laptops draining precious limited battery charge, every electron counts. It is not without reason that performance optimisation is an important art with battery-powered devices.

Auto-cpufreq is a small utility that lets you profile your current power utilisation and recommend suggestions, designed to find the right balance between energy drain and speed so that you get both responsiveness and longevity on your system. This app can monitor CPU frequencies and temperatures, your battery state and system load, and then make recommendations on the optimal CPU frequency scaling, governor and turbo boost management. The changes can be applied temporarily – and once you’re happy –...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 631 for the week of May 10 – 16, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • Other Community News
  • Canonical News
  • In the Press
  • In the Blogosphere
  • In Other News
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, 19.10, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

If you want to draw on your computer, you can always use your mouse. But if you want to really draw, you can upgrade to a drawing tablet (also known as graphics tablets). Here is one below. It is an entry level drawing tablet, has a pressure-sensitive pen that does not require batteries, and the actual tablet to draw on, looks like an over-sized laptop touchpad. Instead of your fingers, you use the pen to move the pointer on your screen.

An entry-level drawing tablet.

In this post we are using the Huion Inspiroy 430P, an entry-level drawing tablet that is supported on Ubuntu. There is mainline support in the Linux kernel for this tablet since 2015, therefore the following should work with Ubuntu 16.04 or newer. They have been tested on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. It is suggested to use a recent version of Ubuntu as there is drawing tablet support in the system settings.

Setting up the the Huion 430P on Ubuntu 20.04

Just connect the drawing tablet to a USB port on your computer. That’s it. Just to make sure, run the following. If you do not get that, write a comment.

$ xsetwacom --list devices
HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus id: 15 type: STYLUS
HUION Huion...

Neste episódio o discutimos tomadas inteligentes, extensões, gestão de cabos e controlo de consumo, redes e equipamento de redes, webcams, revisitamos a questão do ImageMagick no Nextcloud, imagens de Ubuntu Server.

Vejam lá que ainda tivemos tempo para para do UBports da OTA-12, da OTA-13, de PinePhone e Volla Phone

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-server/focal/
  • https://github.com/nextcloud/nextcloud-snap/issues/592
  • https://volla.online/blog/files/community-days-2020.html
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOBkdK0rCho

Apoios

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o...

Sometimes you’ll find yourself doing a job where you need to make alterations to a web page that already exists, and where you can’t change the HTML, so your job is to write some bits of JavaScript to poke at the page, add some attributes and some event handlers, maybe move some things around. This sort of thing comes up a lot with accessibility remediations, but maybe you’re working with an ancient CMS where changing the templates is a no-no, or you’re plugging in some after-the-fact support into a site that can’t be changed without a big approval process but adding a script element is allowed. So you write a script, no worries. How do you test it?

Well, one way is to actually do it: we assume that the way your work will eventually be deployed is that you’ll give the owners a script file, they’ll upload it somehow to the site and add a script element that loads it. That’s likely to be a very slow and cumbersome process, though (if it wasn’t, then you wouldn’t need to be fixing the site by poking it with JS, would you? you’d just fix the HTML as God intended web developers to do) and so there ought to be a better way. A potential better way is to have them add a script element...


I met up with the excellent hosts of the The Changelog podcast at OSCON in Austin a few weeks back, and joined them for a short segment: https://changelog.com/podcast/256

That podcast recording is now live!  Enjoy!


The Changelog 256: Ubuntu Snaps and Bash on Windows Server with Dustin Kirkland
Listen on Changelog.com



Cheers,
Dustin

ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: what’s new?

Ubuntu has supported ZFS as an option for some time. In 19.10, we introduced experimental support on the desktop. As explained by then, having a ZFS on root option on our desktop was only a first step in what we want to achieve by adopting this combined file system and logical volume manager. I strongly suggest you read the 2 above blog posts as introductions to this blog series we are starting. Here we cover what’s new compared to 19.10 in term of installation and general features. We then look at what ZSys, our dedicated helper for ZFS systems, can do for you and how you can interact with it. Finally, for the more tech savy, we will deep dive in to how we use ZFS, store properties and understanding how the puzzle fits together. We will give you tips on how to tweak it at your convenience if you are a ZFS sysadmin expert, while still keeping ZSys advanced capabilities compatible.

Without further ado, let’s dive into this!

ZFS & Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

First thing to note is that our ZFS support with ZSys is still experimental. The installer highlights this in the corresponding screen. With OpenZFS on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, we are building the...

What a brilliant day 1 of GitOps Days it was. Weeks of hard work from a great team went into this, as was quite apparent. Minor glitches, some last minute shuffling of speakers, but apart from that very very seamless. (You can still sign up and get links to the recordings.)

I had a bit of an unusual role: I was DJing at an online event.

Some questions online were about the setup and why I wasn’t changing records during playing (well spotted!). So here’s what I used during the event:

  • 2x Technics SL-1210 MK2 decks
  • Allen & Heath Xone:23 mixer
  • Serato time code vinyls
  • Native Instruments Audio 4 DJ interface
  • Dell XPS 13 (9370) with xwax on Ubuntu 20.04

I’ve used this setup for a long time and it’s rock-solid. Having played real vinyls for years, I just never updated my muscle memory to use a CDJ or any other fancy new controller. At some stage I just had to move on from buying records every weekend or two to digital - there’s just so much more stuff out there and you don’t suffer as much from tracks (and records catching dust) that you find to be quite short-lived.

On the transmission end, I was very lucky that Lucijan (one of my besties) gave me his Windows laptop (in use for making...

Sometimes you just need to search using awk or want to use plain bash to search for an exception in a log file, it’s hard to go into google, stack overflow, duck duck go, or any other place to do a search, and find nothing, or at least a solution that fits your needs.

In my case, I wanted to know where a package was generating a conflict for a friend, and ended up scratching my head, because I didn’t want to write yet another domain specific function to use on the test framework of openQA, and I’m very stubborn, I ended up with the following solution

journalctl -k | awk 'BEGIN {print "Error - ",NR; group=0}
/ACPI BIOS Error (bug)/,/ACPI Error: AE_NOT_FOUND/{ print group"|", 
	$0; if ($0 ~ /ACPI Error: AE_NOT_FOUND,/ ){ print "EOL"; group++ }; 
}'

This is short for:

  • Define $START_PATTERN as /ACPI BIOS Error (bug)/, and $END_PATTERN as /ACPI Error: AE_NOT_FOUND/
  • Look for $START_PATTERN
  • Look for $END_PATTERN
  • If you find $END_PATTERN add an EOL marker (that is not needed, since the group variable will be incremented)

And there you go: How to search for exceptions in logs, of course it could be more complicated, because you can have nested cases and whatnot, but for...

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