What is an operating system?

An operating system (OS) is the Application Which, after being initially loaded into the computer by a boot program, oversees all the other application programs in a computer. The application programs make use of the working system by making Furthermore, users can interact directly with the operating system Via a user interface like a command line or a graphical user interface (GUI).

9 Popular Mobile Operating Systems

Android OS (Google Inc.) ...
2. Bada (Samsung Electronics) ...
BlackBerry OS (Research In Motion) ...
iPhone OS / iOS (Apple) ...
MeeGo OS (Nokia and Intel) ...
Palm OS (Garnet OS) ...
Symbian OS (Nokia) ...
webOS (Palm/HP) ...

Types of operating systems.

Operating systems normally include pre-loaded on almost any Computer you purchase. Many men and women use the operating system which comes with their computer, however it is possible to update or perhaps alter operating systems. The three most frequent operating systems for personal computers are Microsoft Windows, macOS, and Linux. A GUI enables you to use your mouse to click on icons, switches , and menus, and that which is clearly displayed on the display by means of a combo of images and text. Each operating system's GUI includes a different feel and look, so if you Switch to another operating system it might appear unfamiliar at first. However, modern operating systems have been made to be effortless to utilize , and the majority of the fundamental principles are exactly the same.

Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
macOS
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
Linux
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.
Operating systems for mobile devices
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.

Old laptop

I’ve been meaning to get a new laptop for a while now. My ThinkPad X250 is now 5 years old and even though it’s still adequate in many ways, I tend to run out of memory especially when running a few virtual machines. It only has one memory slot, which I maxed out at 16GB shortly after I got it. Memory has been a problem in considering a new machine. Most new laptops have soldered RAM and local configurations tend to ship with 8GB RAM. Getting a new machine with only a slightly better CPU and even just the same amount of RAM as what I have in the X250 seems a bit wasteful. I was eyeing the Lenovo X13 because it’s a super portable that can take up to 32GB of RAM, and it ships with an AMD Ryzen 4000 series chip which has great performance. With Lenovo’s discount for Debian Developers it became even more attractive. Unfortunately that’s in North America only (at least for now) so that didn’t work out this time.

Enter Tongfang

I’ve been reading a bunch of positive reviews about the Tuxedo Pulse 14 and KDE Slimbook 14. Both look like great AMD laptops, supports up to 64GB of RAM and clearly runs Linux well. I also noticed that they look quite similar, and after...

As you may have noticed, the Ubuntu Community Council has been vacant for a while. Happily, a decision has recently been made to repopulate it. Thus, this official announcement for nominations.

We will be filling all seven seats this term, with terms lasting two years. To be eligible, a nominee must be an Ubuntu Member. Ideally, they should have a vast understanding of the Ubuntu community, be well-organized, and be a natural leader.

The work of the Community Council, as it stands, is to uphold the Code of Conduct throughout the community, ensure that all the other leadership boards and council are running smoothly, and to ensure the general health of the community, including not only supporting contributors but also stepping in for dispute resolution, as needed.

Historically, there would be two meetings per month, so the nominee should be willing to commit, at minimum, to that particular time requirement. Additionally, as needs arise, other communication, most often by email, will happen. The input of the entire Council is essential for swift and appropriate actions to get enacted, so participation in these conversations should be expected.

As you might notice from Mark...

Em semana se regresso às aulas, mais 1 episódio no melhor podcast sobre Ubuntu, software livres e outras cenas, de Portugal. Raspberry pi, marmitas e pinetabs fazem parte deste fantástico cardápio.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/diy-maker-school-make-co-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/fall-for-crafting-open-road-media-books?partner=PUP

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat...

This week we’ve been playing with arcade boards and finishing DIY in the kitchen. We discuss if old technology is more fun than new technology, bring you a command line love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 26 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Alan has been playing with arcade games.
    • Mark has been finishing his kitchen.
  • We discuss if old technology is inherently more fun than new technology?
  • We share a Command Line Lurve:
    • opusenc – Podcasts on a Floppy disk
opusenc in.wav --downmix-mono --bitrate 6 --cvbr --framesize 60 out.opus
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
  • Image credit: Luuk Wouters
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our...


Groovy Gorilla Is In Feature Freeze
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel-announce/2020-August/001279.html
Ubuntu Beginning the Switch to NFTables in Groovy Gorilla
https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel/2020-August/041142.html
IP Fire 2.25 Core Update 148 Released with Location-based Firewall
https://blog.ipfire.org/post/ipfire-2-25-core-update-148-released
Lenovo to Ship Fedora on its Thinkpads
https://twitter.com/mattdm/status/1299718126175744000
Raspberry Pi OS 2020-08-20 Out
https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspberry-pi-os/

Q4OS 3.12, Centaurus Out
https://q4os.org/blog.html

Linux from Scratch and Beyond LFS 10 Out
http://lists.linuxfromscratch.org/pipermail/lfs-support/2020-September/053845.html

Linux Mint’s Warpinator via Flatpak Out
https://flathub.org/apps/details/org.x.Warpinator

SuperTuxKart 1.2 Out
https://blog.supertuxkart.net/2020/08/supertuxkart-12-release.html

Htop 3.0 Out
https://groups.io/g/htop/topic/htop_3_0_0_released/76441967

Credits:
Ubuntu “Complete” sound: Canonical

Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust
https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In August, 237.25 work hours have been dispatched among 14 paid contributors. Their reports are available:
  • Abhijith PA did 10.0h (out of 10h assigned).
  • Adrian Bunk did 31h (out of 21.75h assigned and 9.25h from July).
  • Ben Hutchings did 6.25h (out of 16h assigned), thus carrying over 9.75h to September.
  • Brian May did 10h (out of 10h assigned).
  • Chris Lamb did 18h (out of 18h assigned).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 21.75h (out of 21.75h assigned).
  • Holger Levsen did 7h coordinating/managing the LTS team.
  • Markus Koschany did 20h (out of 21.75h assigned and 10.25h from July), thus carrying over 12h to September.
  • Mike Gabriel did 16.0h (out of 8h assigned and 8h from July).
  • Ola Lundqvist did 6.9h (out of 8h assigned and 16h from July), and gave back 5.1h, thus carrying over 12h to September.
  • Roberto C. Sánchez did 21.75h (out of 21.75h assigned).
  • Sylvain Beucler did 21.75h (out of 21.75h assigned).
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 21.75h (out of 21.75h assigned).
  • Utkarsh Gupta did 32.75h (out of 21.75h assigned and anticipating 11h from September).

...

"A person is praised for his insight, but a warped mind leads to contempt." – Proverbs 12:8 (Common English Bible)

It has been a while since I have written anything that might appear on Planet Ubuntu. Specifically the last time was June 26th. That's not necessarily a good thing.

I have been busy writing. What have I been writing? I knocked out a new novelette in Visual Studio Code. The print version was typeset using the novel class using LuaLaTeX. It is a bit of a sci-fi police procedural. It is up on Amazon for people to acquire though I do note that Amazon's print-on-demand costs have gone up a wee bit since the start of the planet-wide coronavirus crisis.

I also have taken time to test the Groovy Gorilla ISOs for Xubuntu. I encourage everybody out there to visit the testing tracker to test disc images for Xubuntu and other flavours as we head towards the release of 20.10 next month. Every release needs as much testing as possible.

Based upon an article from The Register it appears that the Community Council is being brought back to life. Nominations are being sought per a post on the main Discourse instance but readers of this are reminded that you need to be a current...

Disk usage

So, you wake up one day, and find that one of your programs, starts to complainig about “No space left on device”:

Next thing (Obviously, duh?) is to see what happened, so you fire up du -h /tmp right?:

$ du -h /tmp
Filesystem              Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/zkvm1-root  6.2G  4.6G  1.3G  79% /

Well, yes, but no, ok? ok, ok!

Wait, what? there’s space there! How can it be? In all my years of experience (+15!), I’ve never seen such thing!

Gods must be crazy!? or is it a 2020 thing?

I disagree with you

$ touch /tmp
touch: cannot touch ‘/tmp/test’: No space left on device

Wait, what? not even a small empty file?Ok...

After shamelessly googling/duckducking/searching, I ended up at https://blog.merovius.de/2013/10/20/ext4-mysterious-no-space-left-on.html but alas, that was not my problem, although… perhaps too many files?, let’s check with du -i this time:

$ du -i /tmp
`Filesystem             Inodes  IUsed IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/zkvm1-root 417792 417792     0  100% /

Of course!

Because I’m super smart I’m not, I now know where my problem is, too many files!, time to start fixing this…

After few minutes of deleting files, moving things around, bind mounting things, I landed with the actual root cause:

Tons of messages waiting in

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 649 for the week of September 13 – 19, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Call for Ubuntu Community Council nominations
  • Groovy Gorilla (20.10) UI Freeze
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Canonical News
  • In the Press
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

Previously: v5.6

Linux v5.7 was released at the end of May. Here’s my summary of various security things that caught my attention:

arm64 kernel pointer authentication
While the ARMv8.3 CPU “Pointer Authentication” (PAC) feature landed for userspace already, Kristina Martsenko has now landed PAC support in kernel mode. The current implementation uses PACIASP which protects the saved stack pointer, similar to the existing CONFIG_STACKPROTECTOR feature, only faster. This also paves the way to sign and check pointers stored in the heap, as a way to defeat function pointer overwrites in those memory regions too. Since the behavior is different from the traditional stack protector, Amit Daniel Kachhap added an LKDTM test for PAC as well.

BPF LSM
The kernel’s Linux Security Module (LSM) API provide a way to write security modules that have traditionally implemented various Mandatory Access Control (MAC) systems like SELinux, AppArmor, etc. The LSM hooks are numerous and no one LSM uses them all, as some hooks are much more specialized (like those used by IMA, Yama, LoadPin, etc). There was not, however, any way to externally attach to these hooks (not even through a regular loadable...

Over the last few weeks I ported the libebur128 C library to Rust, both with a proper Rust API as well as a 100% compatible C API.

This blog post will be split into 4 parts that will be published over the next weeks

  1. Overview and motivation
  2. Porting approach with various details, examples and problems I ran into along the way
  3. Performance optimizations
  4. Building Rust code into a C library as drop-in replacement

If you’re only interested in the code, that can be found on GitHub and in the ebur128 crate on crates.io.

The initial versions of the ebur128 crate was built around the libebur128 C library (and included its code for ease of building), version 0.1.2 and newer is the pure Rust implementation.

EBU R128

libebur128 implements the EBU R128 loudness standard. The Wikipedia page gives a good summary of the standard, but in short it describes how to measure loudness of an audio signal and how to use this for loudness normalization.

While this intuitively doesn’t sound very complicated, there are lots of little details (like how human ears are actually working) that make this not as easy as one might expect. This results in there being many different ways for measuring loudness and...

Novos modelos Slimbook, actualizações do AppArmor, carabinas com Raspberry pi e muito mais. Novidades trazidas esta semana pelo vosso twitcher preferido: Diogo Constantino e o seu fiel assistente: Tiago Carrondo!

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/diy-maker-school-make-co-books?partner=PUP

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos...

This week we’ve been spying on our children and playing games on Twitch. We discuss the Ubuntu Community Council revival, GNOMEs new versioning scheme, Geary adding encryption support, Plasma 5.20, Xfce 4.16, Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 and Microsoft Edge coming Linux. We also round up our picks from the wider tech news.

It’s Season 13 Episode 27 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Mark has been setting up a nursery camera
    • Martin has been playing Hotshot Racing, Her Majesty’s SPIFFING and Broforce on Wimpy’s World Twitch channel.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • Ubuntu Community Council to be revived
      • Call for Ubuntu Community Council nominations
    • New GNOME versioning scheme
    • Geary: Transparent encryption and signing with GPG ( via Jeffrey Bouter on Telegram)
    • Plasma 5.20 Beta
    • Xfce 4.16 new features and improvements
    • Microsoft Edge is coming to Linux in October
    • Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 release
  • We discuss the news:
    • Wayback Machine and Cloudflare team up to archive more of the Web
    • Melkhior’s Mansion coming soon
    • Microsoft finds underwater datacenters are...

<noscript> <img alt="" src="https://res.cloudinary.com/canonical/image/fetch/f_auto,q_auto,fl_sanitize,w_720/https://ubuntu.com/wp-content/uploads/38d4/finance_blog_image.png" width="720" /> </noscript>

The next 10 years will redefine banking. What will differentiate top banks from their competitors? Data and derived insights.

Banks across the globe have been immersed in their digital agenda and with customers adopting digital banking channels aggressively, banks are collecting massive volumes of data on how customers are interacting at various touch points. Apart from the health of balance sheets, what will differentiate top banks from the competition is how effectively these data assets will be used to make banking simpler and improve their products and services. The challenge for large global banks so far has been to capitalise on huge volumes of data that their siloed business units hold and are often constrained by manual processes, data duplication and legacy systems.

The use cases for data and analytics in banking are endless. Massive data assets will mean that banks can more accurately gauge the risk of offering a loan to a customer. Banks are using data analytics to...

Back in 2012 AArch64 was something new, unknown yet. There was no toolchain support (so no gcc, binutils or glibc). And I got assigned to get some stuff running around it.

OpenEmbedded

As there was no hardware cross compilation was the only way. Which meant OpenEmbedded as we wanted to have wide selection of software available.

I learnt how to use modern OE (with OE Core and layers) by building images for ARMv7 and checking them on some boards I had floating around my desk.

Non-public toolchain work

Some time later first non-public patches for binutils and gcc arrived in my inbox. Then eglibc ones. So I started building and on 12th September 2012 I was able to build helloworld:

12:38 hrw@puchatek:aarch64-oe-linux$ ./aarch64-oe-linux-gcc ~/devel/sources/hello.c -o hello
12:38 hrw@puchatek:aarch64-oe-linux$ file hello
hello: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.6.39, not stripped
12:39 hrw@puchatek:aarch64-oe-linux$ objdump -f hello

hello:     file format elf64-littleaarch64
architecture: aarch64, flags 0x00000112: 
EXEC_P, HAS_SYMS, D_PAGED 
start address 0x00000000004003e0

Then images followed. Several people at...

The Linux 5.9-rc6 kernel source contains over 300,000 literal strings used in kernel messages of various sorts (errors, warnings, etc) and it is no surprise that typos and spelling mistakes slip into these messages from time to time.

To catch spelling mistakes I run a daily automated job that fetches the tip from linux-next and runs a fast spelling checker tool that finds all spelling mistakes and then diff's these against the results from the previous day.  The diff is emailed to me and I put my kernel janitor hat on, fix these up and send these to the upstream developers and maintainers.

The spelling checker tool is a fast-and-dirty C parser that finds literal strings and also variable names and checks these against a US English dictionary containing over 100,000 words. As fun weekend side project I hand optimized the checker to be able to parse and spell check several millions lines of kernel C code per second.

Every 3 or so months I collate all the fixes I've made and where appropriate I add new spelling mistake patterns to the kernel checkpatch spelling dictionary.   Kernel developers should in practice run checkpatch.pl on their patches before submitting them upstream and...

Launchpad still requires Python 2, which in 2020 is a bit of a problem. Unlike a lot of the rest of 2020, though, there’s good reason to be optimistic about progress.

I’ve been porting Python 2 code to Python 3 on and off for a long time, from back when I was on the Ubuntu Foundations team and maintaining things like the Ubiquity installer. When I moved to Launchpad in 2015 it was certainly on my mind that this was a large body of code still stuck on Python 2. One option would have been to just accept that and leave it as it is, maybe doing more backporting work over time as support for Python 2 fades away. I’ve long been of the opinion that this would doom Launchpad to being unmaintainable in the long run, and since I genuinely love working on Launchpad - I find it an incredibly rewarding project - this wasn’t something I was willing to accept. We’re already seeing some of our important dependencies dropping support for Python 2, which is perfectly reasonable on their terms but which is starting to become a genuine obstacle to delivering important features when we need new features from newer versions of those dependencies. It also looks as though it may be difficult for...

The Snap Store has been designed to enable upstream developers and enthusiastic community contributors to publish snaps. As with most Linux packaging solutions, the wider community are often responsible for starting and maintaining software packages. This is a double-edged sword, especially for humans with limited life spans and other shiny things to steal their attention.

If a community contributor decides to move on from maintaining software packaging, has too many other things on their plate, or life just gets in the way, it’s not necessarily a problem. Users are appreciative that someone packaged up their favourite application, but can get upset quickly if that software is no longer updated. Snap publishers who are overwhelmed or busy doing other things have some options here.

Automate yourself out of existence

We recommend the first course of action is to ensure snaps are published via automated tools to reduce manual steps in the publishing workflow. Using the snapcraft build service or 3rd party tools such as Travis or Circle CI will reduce the workload on a typical snap publisher. A well crafted snapcraft yaml will often result in automated builds getting published in...

NordVPN is one of many VPN services. I was asked to have a look at how to make it work in a LXD container and as a result I am writing this post. I am not advertising this service, nor do I use affiliate links, etc. Up to now, NordVPN have refused to fix their official Linux client to work in a container.

Installing the official client

Let’s install the official client in a LXD container. Create a container and get a shell into it. Then, download the Deb package and install it. The initial Deb package is really small. It just has instructions to setup the NordVPN repository to your system. After you install this package, you apt update to refresh the package list and then you can install the actual nordvpn package.

$ lxc launch ubuntu:18.04 nordvpn
Creating nordvpn
Starting nordvpn
$ lxc ubuntu nordvpn
ubuntu@nordvpn:~$ wget https://repo.nordvpn.com/deb/nordvpn/debian/pool/main/nordvpn-release_1.0.0_all.deb
ubuntu@nordvpn:~$ sudo apt install -f ./nordvpn-release_1.0.0_all.deb
...
ubuntu@nordvpn:~$ sudo apt update
...
ubuntu@nordvpn:~$ sudo apt install -y nordvpn
...
NordVPN for Linux successfully installed!
To get started, type 'nordvpn login' and enter your NordVPN...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 646 for the week of August 23 – 29, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Switching iptables to use the nftables backend (again) on Sept 3
  • Groovy Gorilla (to be 20.10) Feature Freeze
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Xfce 4.16pre1 released
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

Debian packaging

2020-08-07: Sponsor package python-sabyenc (4.0.2-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-07: Sponsor package gpxpy (1.4.2-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-07: Sponsor package python-jellyfish (0.8.2-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-08: Sponsor package django-ipwire (3.0.0-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-08: Sponsor package python-mongoengine (0.20.0-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-08: Review package pdfminer (20191020+dfsg-3) (Needs some more work) (Python team request).

2020-08-08: Upload package bundlewrap (4.1.0-1) to Debian unstable.

2020-08-09: Sponsor package pdfminer (20200726-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-09: Sponsor package spyne (2.13.15-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-09: Review package mod-wsgi (4.6.8-2) (Needs some more work) (Python team request).

2020-08-10: Sponsor package nfoview (1.28-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-11: Sponsor package pymupdf (1.17.4+ds1-1) for Debian unstable (Python team request).

2020-08-11: Upload package calamares...

The Kubuntu Council and Community would like to thank Linode for once again renewing their sponsorship of Kubuntu by providing us with another year’s usage of a VPS instance.

This is, and will continue to be, an invaluable resource, helping us make Kubuntu releases easier and better.

Specifically, the VPS allows us to:

  • Run remote build nodes for our Kubuntu CI Jenkins server, that helps us keep up with rapid upstream changes. Our CI is currently down for reworking of the Jenkins tooling, but this will come back in the next few months.
  • Host remote packaging containers for our developers and packagers. This not only proves a clean environment, but the super fast upload speeds allow us to make short work of the many hundreds of PPA and distribution package uploads required.
  • Run autopkgtests (QA) tests so we can fix these prior to upload.
  • Generate QA web pages for our builds, so problems can be identified and solved.

Specs: Linode 32GB: 8 CPU, 640GB Storage, 32GB RAM, Download 40 Gbps, Upload 7000 Mbps.

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, albeit a bit later due to vacation, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In July, 249.25 work hours have been dispatched among 14 paid contributors. Their reports are available:
  • Abhijith PA did 18.0h (out of 14h assigned and 6h from June), and gave back 2h to the pool.
  • Adrian Bunk did 16.0h (out of 25.25h assigned), thus carrying over 9.25h to August.
  • Ben Hutchings did 5h (out of 20h assigned), and gave back the remaining 15h.
  • Brian May did 10h (out of 10h assigned).
  • Chris Lamb did 18h (out of 18h assigned).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 60h (out of 5.75h assigned and 54.25h from June).
  • Holger Levsen spent 10h (out of 10h assigned) for managing LTS and ELTS contributors.
  • Markus Koschany did 15h (out of 25.25h assigned), thus carrying over 10.25h to August.
  • Mike Gabriel did nothing (out of 8h assigned), thus is carrying over 8h for August.
  • Ola Lundqvist did 3h (out of 12h assigned and 7h from June), thus carrying over 16h to August.
  • Roberto C. Sánchez did 26.5h (out of 25.25h assigned and 1.25h from June).
  • Sylvain Beucler did 25.25h (out of 25.25h assigned).
  • Thorsten Alteholz...

De volta ao trabalho, e aos episódios gravados semanalmente, o Diogo vai neste episódio contar-nos todas as duas aventuras e desventuras durantes as suas impressionantes semanas de férias. o Carrondo também esteve de férias mas contou menos…

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/programming-productivity-mercury-books?partner=pup
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/advanced-computer-security-and-privacy-morgan-claypool-books?partner=pup

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o...

This week we’ve been playing Fall Guys. We discuss the Pinebook Pro and Pine Phone (we have hardware), bring you some command line love and respond to your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 24 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been playing Fall Guys.
  • We discuss discuss is the PinePhone and Pinebook Pro.
  • We share a Command Line Lurve:
    • version – Tells you the version of a program
version java
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
  • Image credit: Wynand van Poortvliet
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet us or Toot us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

  • Join us in the Ubuntu Podcast Telegram group.

KDE’s annual conference starts tomorrow with a day of tutorials.  There’s two days of talks at the weekend and the rest of the week with meetings and BoFs.

Register now.

Tomorrow European morning you can learn about QML, Debugging or speed up dev workflows.  In the evening a choice of QML, Multithreading and Implicit Bias training.

Saturday morning the talks start with a Keynote at 09:00UTC and then I’m up talking about the All About the Apps Goal.  There’s an overview of the Wayland and Consistency goals too plus we have a panel to discuss them.

Saturday early evening I’m looking forward to some talks about Qt 6 updates and “Integrating Hollywood Open Source with KDE Applications” sounds intriguing.

On Sunday European morning I’m scared but excited to learn more elite C++ from Ivan, but I hear Linux is being rewritten in Rust so that’s worth learning about next.  And it doesn’t get much more exciting than the Wag Company tails.

In the afternoon those of us who care about licences will enjoy Open Source Compliance and an early win for Kubuntu was switching to System Settings so it’ll be good to get an update Behind the Scene.

On Monday join us for some tutorial on getting...


Ubuntu LTS Point Releases Are Here
http://fridge.ubuntu.com/2020/08/06/ubuntu-20-04-1-lts-released/
http://fridge.ubuntu.com/2020/08/14/ubuntu-18-04-5-lts-released/
http://fridge.ubuntu.com/2020/08/14/ubuntu-16-04-7-lts-released/
 
Rolling Rhino Turns Ubuntu 20.04 into a Rolling Release
https://github.com/wimpysworld/rolling-rhino
 
Boothole, A Linux Security Vulnerability
https://eclypsium.com/2020/07/29/theres-a-hole-in-the-boot/
 
Red Hat’s Boothole Fix Causes Issues
https://www.zdnet.com/article/red-hat-enterprise-linux-runs-into-boothole-patch-trouble/
 
Firefox Cuts Jobs Again
https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/08/firefox-maker-mozilla-lays-off-250-workers-says-covid-19-lowered-revenue/
 
Debian 10.5 Out
https://www.debian.org/News/2020/20200801

MX Linux 19.2 KDE Out
https://mxlinux.org/blog/mx-19-2-kde-now-available/

Kali Linux 2020.3 Out
https://www.kali.org/news/kali-2020-3-release/

KDE Neon, Based on Ubuntu 20.04, Out
https://blog.neon.kde.org/index.php/2020/08/10/kde-neon-rebased-on-20-04/

Kernel 5.8 Out
https://itsfoss.com/kernel-5-8-release/

Kernel 5.9 rc1 Out
http://lkml.iu.edu/hypermail/linux/kernel/2008.2/00223.html

Gnome 3.36.5 Out

Previously: v5.5.

Linux v5.6 was released back in March. Here’s my quick summary of various features that caught my attention:

WireGuard
The widely used WireGuard VPN has been out-of-tree for a very long time. After 3 1/2 years since its initial upstream RFC, Ard Biesheuvel and Jason Donenfeld finished the work getting all the crypto prerequisites sorted out for the v5.5 kernel. For this release, Jason has gotten WireGuard itself landed. It was a twisty road, and I’m grateful to everyone involved for sticking it out and navigating the compromises and alternative solutions.

openat2() syscall and RESOLVE_* flags
Aleksa Sarai has added a number of important path resolution “scoping” options to the kernel’s open() handling, covering things like not walking above a specific point in a path hierarchy (RESOLVE_BENEATH), disabling the resolution of various “magic links” (RESOLVE_NO_MAGICLINKS) in procfs (e.g. /proc/$pid/exe) and other pseudo-filesystems, and treating a given lookup as happening relative to a different root directory (as if it were in a chroot, RESOLVE_IN_ROOT). As part of this, it became clear that there wasn’t a way to correctly extend the existing openat() syscall,...

This week we have been watching The Mandalorian. We discuss a new look for UKUI, HP Z series computers with Ubuntu pre-installed, elementary OS on Pinebook, Active Directory integration in Ubuntu Desktop, and making apps for GNOME. We also round up some picks from the tech news.

It’s Season 13 Episode 25 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Martin has been watching The Mandalorian.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • Making apps for Linux, a proposal
    • UKUI 3.1 Makes Some Major Visual Changes
    • There’s Now an Official Todoist App for Linux
    • HP Z series on Ubuntu
    • elementary OS Adds Experimental Support for the Pinebook Pro
    • Ubuntu 20.10 adding Active Directory support to the installer
    • GNOME Power-Profiles-Daemon Taking Shape For Better System/Laptop Power Controls
  • We mention some events:
    • People Powered Community Building Book Club: Every Tuesday at 09:00PST from October 6th to December 15th – online.
  • We discuss the news:
    • Fall Guys to use Fortnite’s anti-cheat software
    • Minecraft’s pack.png found at 3257840388504953787 x=49, z=0
    • Super Mario 3D All...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 647 for the week of August 30 – September 5, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Making apps for Linux, a proposal
  • security things in Linux v5.6
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

If you are looking for a new phone that either respects your privacy, leaves you in control, or just has a different form factor from the now ubiquitous 6″ slab, there are quite a few projects in various states of readiness

Freedom:

  • vollaphone
  • oneplus
  • pinephone
  • librem 5
  • fairphone

Different form factors:

  • unihertz atom and titan
  • gemini and cosmo

Earlier this year I bought a pinephone, braveheart edition. I’ve tried several OSes on it. Just yesterday, I tried:

  • sailfish: looked great, but it would not recognize sim, and crashed when launching browser.
  • ubports (ubuntu touch): looked good, texting worked, but crashed when launching app store and would not ring on incoming calls.
  • mobian: nice set of default apps, but again would not ring on incoming calls.

So I’m back to running what I’ve had on it for a month or two – sxmo, the suckless mobile operating system. It’s an interesting, different take on> interacting with the phone, and I quite like it. More importantly, for now it’s the most reliable as a communication devvice. With it, I can

  • make and receive calls and texts.
  • send texts using vi :).
  • easily send/receive mail using mbsync, mutt, and msmtp.
  • easily...

This week, last week, Last month, I attended DebConf 20 Online. It was the first DebConf to be held entirely online, but it’s the 7th DebConf I’ve attended from home.

My first one was DebConf7. Initially I mostly started watching the videos because I wanted to learn more about packaging. I had just figured out how to create binary packages by hand, and have read through the new maintainers guide, but a lot of it was still a mystery. By the end of DebConf7 my grasp of source packages was still a bit thin, but other than that, I ended up learning a lot more about Debian during DebConf7 than I had hoped for, and over the years, the quality of online participation for each DebConf has varied a lot.

I think having a completely online DebConf, where everyone was remote, helped raise awareness about how important it is to make the remote experience work well, and I hope that it will make people who run sessions at physical events in the future consider those who are following remotely a bit more.

During some BoF sessions, it was clear that some teams haven’t talked to each other face to face in a while, and I heard at least 3 teams who said “This was nice, we should do more...

Viewers on Planet Ubuntu can see the videos on my original post.

Akademy 2020 launched in style with this video starring moi and many other good looking contributors..

We’re online now, streaming onto YouTube at room 1 and room 2 or register for the event to get involved.

I gave the first KDE talk of the conference talking about the KDE is All About the Apps goal

And after the Consistency and Wayland talks we had a panel session.

Talks are going on for the next three hours this European early evening.  And start again tomorrow (Sunday).

 

In the spring of 2020, the GNOME project ran their Community Engagement Challenge in which teams proposed ideas that would “engage beginning coders with the free and open-source software community [and] connect the next generation of coders to the FOSS community and keep them involved for years to come.” I have a few thoughts on this topic, and so does Alan Pope, and so we got chatting and put together a proposal for a programming environment for making simple apps in a way that new developers could easily grasp. We were quite pleased with it as a concept, but: it didn’t get selected for further development. Oh well, never mind. But the ideas still seem good to us, so I think it’s worth publishing the proposal anyway so that someone else has the chance to be inspired by it, or decide they want it to happen. Here:

Cabin: Creating simple apps for Linux, by Stuart Langridge and Alan Pope

I’d be interested in your thoughts.

For the past few months, I’ve been running a handful of SSH Honeypots on some cloud providers, including Google Cloud, DigitalOcean, and NameCheap. As opposed to more complicated honeypots looking at attacker behavior, I decided to do something simple and was only interested in where they were coming from, what tools might be in use, and what credentials they are attempting to use to authenticate. My dataset includes 929,554 attempted logins over a period of a little more than 3 months.

If you’re looking for a big surprise, I’ll go ahead and let you down easy: my analysis hasn’t located any new botnets or clusters of attackers. But it’s been a fascinating project nonetheless.

Honeypot Design

With a mere 200ish lines of Go, I implemented a honeypot server using the golang.org/x/crypto/ssh library as the underlying implementation. I advertised a portable OpenSSH version as the server version string (sent to clients on connection). I then logged each connection to a SQLite database, including the timestamp, IP address, client version, and credentials used to (attempt to) authenticate.

Analysis of Credentials

In a surprise to absolutely nobody, root is by far the most...

<noscript> <img alt="" src="https://res.cloudinary.com/canonical/image/fetch/f_auto,q_auto,fl_sanitize,w_720/https://ubuntu.com/wp-content/uploads/d1bf/The-State-of-Robotics.jpg" width="720" /> </noscript>

So that’s the summer gone (hopefully, that heat was awful). Or winter if that’s where you are. Seasons change and so does the state of robotics. Fortunately, that’s what we’re here for. Before we get into it, as ever, If you’re working on any robotics projects that you’d like us to talk about, be sure to get in touch. Fire an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., we’d love to hear about it and share it with our audience.

ROS Kickstart

Interested in getting started with ROS 2 but not quite sure where to start? ROS is huge, and even though there’s a ton of great documentation, it can be overwhelming just to figure out where to start. If you find yourself needing some guidance, check out the recently published tutorial and associated videos on ROS basics from your friendly Ubuntu Robotics team. They’re intended to introduce you to the fundamental concepts of ROS so you can dive into the more advanced documentation.

ROS and ESP32: Great Together!

The ESP32 system-on-a-chip...

Demos folga Tiago Carrondo, mas para compensar os ouvintes o David Negreira veio fazer uma perninha. Falámos de redes caseiras, escritórios, do Interrruptor da Rute Correira, do KDE Plasma e workflows, dos novos HP certificados com Ubuntu e das novidades muitas e fixes do
do Groovy Gorila.

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/diy-maker-school-make-co-books?partner=PUP
  • https://www.humblebundle.com/books/advanced-computer-security-and-privacy-morgan-claypool-books?partner=PUP

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago...

The new uNav 3 is here! A simple, easy & beautiful GPS Navigator for Ubuntu Touch! 100% Libre. Doesn't track you, it respects you. Powered by Openstreemap. Online & offline (powered by OSM Scout Server) GPS Navigation. Enjoy it in your UBPorts device!

You’d think we would be running out of terrible/great (delete as applicable) 80s songs to try and shoehorn into the titles of these blog posts. Turns out, not quite yet!

“How can I help?” is a phrase often used in Open Source projects by enthusiastic users and developers. There are a lot of moving parts that make up the snap ecosystem. Which means there’s a whole bunch of places to get involved! 

Finding somewhere to get started can be daunting, but we’re here to signpost your way. Whatever your skill level, and time available, we’re sure we can find an opportunity for an enthusiast to make their mark.

Snaps

Let’s start with snaps themselves. Typically, users will care more about the software they use on a daily basis than the tools that builds it, or the servers that host the bits. Users of the Firefox snap care about the experience of that application, whereas a VLC user is more interested in media playback or video capture using that application.

As such providing feedback to the publishers of those snaps is a great first step on the way to getting involved. Many snap publishers have pre-release or beta builds of their software in different channels in the Snap Store. For...

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 644 for the week of August 9 – 15, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

  • Ubuntu 16.04.7 LTS released
  • Ubuntu 18.04.5 LTS released
  • Lubuntu 18.04.5 Released!
  • Ubuntu Stats
  • Hot in Support
  • LoCo Events
  • Call for testing: improved WiFi via iwd
  • Cloud-init Online Summit – Save the Date Sept 23-24
  • Canonical News
  • In the Blogosphere
  • Featured Audio and Video
  • Meeting Reports
  • Upcoming Meetings and Events
  • Updates and Security for 16.04, 18.04, and 20.04
  • And much more!

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

The Scotland Open Source Podcast by Ashley Nicolson of Scotland OSUM is a new listen available on all the Podcast services which interviews devs and contributors in Scotland.  It’s had hacker spaces in Aberdeen with FreeBSD spod Tom Jones, Ensuring longevity after unfortunate circumstances in OSS Projects with Chocolatey dude Gary Ewan Park, Greg Sutcluiffe of Red Hat and Ansible on Education and PR and most recently me chatting about Quaker geek collectives.

Add it to your subscribed podcasts for more coming soon.

Recently, I discovered bashtop, yet another fancy top-like utility that’s mostly written in bash (it uses some python3-psutil and shells out to other common system utilities). I like its use of high-colour graphics and despite being written in bash, it’s not as resource heavy as I would have expected and also quite snappy (even on a raspberry pi). While writing this post, I also discovered that the author of bashtop ported it to Python and that the python version is called bpytop (hmm, doesn’t quite have the same ring to it), which is even faster and less resource intensive than the bash version (although I haven’t tried that yet, I guess I will soon…).

I set out to package it, but someone beat me to it, but since I’m also on the backports team these days, I went ahead and backported it for buster. So if you have backports enabled, you can now install it using “apt install bashtop -t buster-backports”.

Dylan Aïssi, who packaged bashtop in Debian, has already filed an ITP for bpytop, so we’ll soon have yet another top-like tool in our collection :-)

Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, we are pleased to announce that Lubuntu 18.04.5 LTS has been released! What is Lubuntu? Lubuntu is an official Ubuntu flavor which uses the Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment (LXDE). The project’s goal is to provide a lightweight yet functional Linux distribution based on a rock solid […]

Mais 1! O Podcast Ubuntu Portugal volta abordar os temas que realmente interessam à Humanidade e ao seu desenvolvimento: Snowboard! Foram ainda abordados outros temas menores só mesmo para encher…

Já sabem: oiçam, subscrevam e partilhem!

Apoios

Podem apoiar o podcast usando os links de afiliados do Humble Bundle, porque ao usarem esses links para fazer uma compra, uma parte do valor que pagam reverte a favor do Podcast Ubuntu Portugal.
E podem obter tudo isso com 15 dólares ou diferentes partes dependendo de pagarem 1, ou 8.
Achamos que isto vale bem mais do que 15 dólares, pelo que se puderem paguem mais um pouco mais visto que têm a opção de pagar o quanto quiserem.

Se estiverem interessados em outros bundles não listados nas notas usem o link https://www.humblebundle.com/?partner=PUP e vão estar também a apoiar-nos.

Atribuição e licenças

Este episódio foi produzido por Diogo Constantino e Tiago Carrondo e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço, o Senhor Podcast.

A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da [CC0 1.0 Universal License](https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/).

Este...

This week we’ve been trying to fix ice-makers and creating a new Discord server. We discuss appealing to communities, bring you another command line love and go over all your wonderful feedback.

It’s Season 13 Episode 22 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Alan has been trying to fix his ice-maker.
    • Martin has been creating a Discord server.
  • We discuss appealing to communities.
    • Partly triggered by the university of costumed heroes video from the FSF.
  • We share a command line love:
    • nvtop – NVIDIA GPUs htop like monitoring tool
sudo apt install nvtop
nvtop
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!
    • WASD “Skeletor” mechanical keyboard.
    • Ooni – portable wood-fired pizza oven.
  • Image credit: Yan Ming
  • We are running a crowd funder to cover our audio production costs on Patreon.
  • You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube.

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to

On 2020-08-13, we deployed an update that caused users whose full names contain non-ASCII characters (which is of course very common) to be unable to log into Launchpad. We heard about this serious regression from users on 2020-08-17, and rolled out a fix on 2020-08-18. We’re sorry about this; it doesn’t meet the standards of both inclusion and quality that we set for ourselves. This post aims to explain what happened, technical details of why it happened, and the steps we’ve taken to avoid it happening again.

Launchpad still runs on Python 2. This is a problem, and we’ve been gradually chipping away at it for the last couple of years. With about three-quarters of a million lines of Python code in the main tree and over 200 dependencies, it’s a big job – but we’re well underway!

Some of those dependencies have been difficult problems in their own right. The one at issue here was python-openid, which we use as part of our login workflow, but which hasn’t been actively maintained for over ten years. Fortunately, in this case we didn’t have to port it ourselves, because there were already a couple of forks featuring Python 3 support while preserving more or less...

https://www.mixcloud.com/dholbach/waking-up-on-sunday-just-outside-strausberg/

  1. Baobab - Aduna Jarul Naawo
  2. Alexander - Truth
  3. Dal - Fontanel
  4. Baz Luhrmann - Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)
  5. The Silver Thunders - Fresales eternos
  6. Camila Costa - Ponto das caboclas
  7. Louis Armstrong - The Creator Has A Masterplan
  8. Burhou - Please Delete
  9. Jimi Jules - Running Away
  10. Valentin Stip - Angst
  11. Lukas Endhardt - Rond De Jambe (Bootleg)
  12. Paul Anka - Put Your Head On My Shoulder
  13. The Peddlers - On A Clear Day You Can See Forever
  14. The Kinks - Sunny Afternoon
  15. Peder - timetakesthetimetimetakes
  16. Fleetwood Mac - Albatross
  17. Tropical Hi-Fi - Tahiti Blue (feat. Mike Cooper)
  18. The Dirty Diary - Dead Jazz
  19. Jeff Bridges - Lost in space
  20. Paoli - Milonga Para Javier
  21. Red Axes - Papa Sooma
  22. Soft Hair - Lying Has To Stop
  23. Rock Steady Freddy - Bohemian Rhapsody (Black Messiah Dub)
  24. King Jammy & Scientist - the death of mr spock (tokyo tower version)
  25. Bendaly family vs. Center of the Universe - Do you love me

One of the projects I’m working on involves creating a little device which you talk to from your phone. So, I thought, I’ll do this properly. No “cloud service” that you don’t need; no native app that you don’t need; you’ll just send data from your phone to it, locally, and if the owners go bust it won’t brick all your devices. I think a lot of people want their devices to live on beyond the company that sold them, and they want their devices to be under their own control, and they want to be able to do all this from any device of their choosing; their phone, their laptop, whatever. An awful lot of devices don’t do some or all of that, and perhaps we can do better. That is, here’s the summary of that as a sort of guiding principle, which we’re going to try to do:

You should be able to communicate a few hundred KB of data to the device locally, without needing a cloud service by using a web app rather than a native app from an Android phone.

Here’s why that doesn’t work. Android and Chrome, I am very disappointed in you.

Bluetooth LE

The first reaction here is to use Bluetooth LE. This is what it’s for; it’s easy to use, phones support it, Chrome on Android has Web Bluetooth,...

This week we’ve using new wireless headphones and test driving a Tesla. We discuss Mark Shuttleworth responding to feedback about Snapcraft, Jupiter Broadcasting regaining independence, Ayatana Indicators becoming cross-distro, Yaru Colors and we round up our picks from the tech news.

It’s Season 13 Episode 23 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss what we’ve been up to recently:
    • Mark has been using new headphones.
    • Alan has been test driving a Tesla model 3 performance.
  • We discuss the community news:
    • [The Manjaro community has a new home](https://forum.manjaro.org/t/welcome-to-the-new-manjaro-forum/151
    • Mark Shuttleworth speaks
    • Jupiter Broadcasting is independent again
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Snapcraft channels and, consequently, tracks are an important, highly useful element of the snap ecosystem. Tracks enable snap developers to publish multiple supported releases of their application under the same snap name. All snaps must have a default track – called latest, but there can be many others, giving both developers flexibility in how they release their applications to end users.

So far, track management was only possible through the Snap Store Web interface, which we have extensively reviewed last week. Now, you can view tracks, and very shortly, you will also be able set the default track using the snapcraft command line. We wanted to use this opportunity to showcase this upcoming set of features.

Ready, snap, set

The first thing you may want to do is check the availability of existing tracks for a given snaps. This can be done using the snapcraft list-tracks command (snapcraft 4.2 onwards), for instance:

snapcraft list-tracks node
Name    Status    Creation-Date         Version-Pattern
latest  active    -                     -
6       active    2018-02-27T13:25:05Z  -
8       active    2018-02-27T13:26:02Z  -
9       active    2018-02-27T13:26:08Z  -
10      active   ...

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