What is an operating system?

An operating system (OS) is the Application Which, after being initially loaded into the computer by a boot program, oversees all the other application programs in a computer. The application programs make use of the working system by making Furthermore, users can interact directly with the operating system Via a user interface like a command line or a graphical user interface (GUI).

9 Popular Mobile Operating Systems

Android OS (Google Inc.) ...
2. Bada (Samsung Electronics) ...
BlackBerry OS (Research In Motion) ...
iPhone OS / iOS (Apple) ...
MeeGo OS (Nokia and Intel) ...
Palm OS (Garnet OS) ...
Symbian OS (Nokia) ...
webOS (Palm/HP) ...

Types of operating systems.

Operating systems normally include pre-loaded on almost any Computer you purchase. Many men and women use the operating system which comes with their computer, however it is possible to update or perhaps alter operating systems. The three most frequent operating systems for personal computers are Microsoft Windows, macOS, and Linux. A GUI enables you to use your mouse to click on icons, switches , and menus, and that which is clearly displayed on the display by means of a combo of images and text. Each operating system's GUI includes a different feel and look, so if you Switch to another operating system it might appear unfamiliar at first. However, modern operating systems have been made to be effortless to utilize , and the majority of the fundamental principles are exactly the same.

Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
Microsoft Windows
Microsoft established the Windows operating platform at the mid-1980s. There have been a number of distinct variants of Windows, but the latest ones are Windows 10 (published in 2015), Windows 8 (2012), Windows 7 (2009), along with Windows Vista (2007). Windows includes pre-loaded on many new PCs, which helps to ensure it is the hottest operating system on the planet.
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
macOS
MacOS (formerly called OS X) is a Lineup of operating systems made by Apple. It comes preloaded on all Macintosh computers, or Macs. A number of the specific models include Mojave (published in 2018), High Sierra (2017), and Sierra (2016). Based on StatCounter Global Stats, macOS users accounts for significantly less than 10 percent of international functioning systems--considerably lower than the percent of Windows users (greater than 80 percent ). 1 reason behind this is that Apple computers have a tendency to be costlier. But a lot of individuals do prefer the appearance and feel of macOS over Windows.
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
Linux
Linux (pronounced LINN-ux) is a household of open-source operating systems, so they may be altered and distributed by all around the globe. This differs from proprietary program such as Windows, which may only be altered by the organization that owns it. The benefits of Linux are that it's free, and there are several different distributions or variations you may select from. Based on StatCounter Global Stats, Linux users accounts for under 2 percent of international functioning systems. But most servers run Linux since it's relatively simple to personalize.
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.
Operating systems for mobile devices
The operating systems we have been speaking about so much were created to operate on desktop and notebook computers. Mobile apparatus like telephones , tablets , and MP3 players Are distinct from desktop and notebook computers, so that they run operating systems that have been designed especially for mobile devices. From the screenshot below, you can view iOS running in an iPad. Operating systems for mobile devices normally are not as fully featured As those created for desktop and notebook computers, and they are not capable to Run each the exact same software. But, you can still perform a Great Deal of things Together, like watch videos, browse the net, manage your calendarand play games.

David Tomaschik: Everyone in InfoSec Should Know How to Program

Okay, I’m not going to lie, the title was a bit of clickbait. I don’t believe that everyone in InfoSec really needs to know how to program, just almost everyone. Now, before my fellow practitioners jump on me, saying they can do their job just fine without programming, I’d appreciate you hearing me out.

So, how’d I get on this? Well, a thread on a private Slack discussing whether Red Team operators should know how to program, followed by people on Reddit asking if they should know how to program. I thought I’d share my views in a concrete (and longer) format here.

Computers are Useless without Programs

I realize that it sounds idomatic, but computers don’t do anything without programs. Programs are what gives a computer the ability to, well, be useful. So I think we can all agree that information security, as an industry, is based entirely around software.

I submit that knowing how to program makes most roles more effective merely by having a better understanding of how software works. Understanding I/O, network connectivity, etc., at the application layer will help professionals do a better job of understanding how software affects their role.

That being said, this...


Okay, I’m not going to lie, the title was a bit of clickbait. I don’t believe that everyone in InfoSec really needs to know how to program, just almost everyone. Now, before my fellow practitioners jump on me, saying they can do their job just fine without programming, I’d appreciate you hearing me out.

So, how’d I get on this? Well, a thread on a private Slack discussing whether Red Team operators should know how to program, followed by people on Reddit asking if they should know how to program. I thought I’d share my views in a concrete (and longer) format here.

Computers are Useless without Programs

I realize that it sounds idomatic, but computers don’t do anything without programs. Programs are what gives a computer the ability to, well, be useful. So I think we can all agree that information security, as an industry, is based entirely around software.

I submit that knowing how to program makes most roles more effective merely by having a better understanding of how software works. Understanding I/O, network connectivity, etc., at the application layer will help professionals do a better job of understanding how software affects their role.

That being said, this is probably not reason enough to learn to program.

Learning to Program Opens Doors

I suppose this point can be summarized as “more skills makes you more employable”, which is probably (again) idiomatic, but it’s probably worth considering. There are roles and organizations that will expect you to be able to program as part of the core expectations.

For example, if you currently work in the SoC, and you want to work on building/refining the tools used in the SoC, you’ll need to program.

Alternatively, if you want to move laterally to certain roles, those roles will require programming – application security, tool development, etc.

You Will Be More Efficient

There are so many times where I could have done something manually, but ended up writing a program of some sort to do it instead. Maybe you have a range of IPs and need to check which of them are running a particular webserver, or you want to combine several CSVs based on one or two fields on them. Maybe you just want to automate some daily task.

As a Red Teamer, I often write scripts to accomplish a variety of tasks:

  • Check a bunch of servers for a Vulnerability/Misconfiguration
  • Proof of Concept to Exploit a Vulnerability
  • Analyze large sets of data
  • Write custom implants (“Remote Access Toolkits”)
  • Modify tools to limit scope

On the blue side, I know people who write programs to:

  • Analyze log files when Splunk, etc. just won’t do
  • Analyze large PCAPs
  • Convert configurations between formats
  • Provide web interfaces to tools that lack them

How much do you need to know?

Well, technically none, depending on your role. But if you’ve read this far, I hope you’re convinced of the benefits. I’m not suggesting everyone needs to be a full-on software engineer or be coding every day, but knowing something about programming is useful.

I suggest learning a language like Python or Ruby, since they have REPLs, a “read-eval-print loop”. These provide an interactive prompt where you can run statements and see the responses immediately. Python seems to be more commonly used for InfoSec tooling, but they both are good options to get things done.

I would focus on file and network operations, and not so much on complicated algorithms or data structures. While those can be useful, standard libraries tend to have common algorithms (searching, sorting, etc.) well-covered. Having a sensible data structure makes code more readable, but there’s not often a need for “low level” structures in a high level language.

Have I Convinced You?

Hopefully I’ve convinced you. If you want to learn programming with a security-specific slant, I can highly recommend some books from No Starch Press:

  • Black Hat Go
  • Black Hat Python
  • Gray Hat Python
  • Gray Hat C#

Read full article on Planet Ubuntu


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